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Current Exhibits

Welcome Home: Oklahomans and the War in Vietnam

Welcome Home: Oklahomans and the War in Vietnam exhibit looks at more than the historic events that occurred during the war. It explores the impact of the war on Oklahoma families, as told through the stories of the young men and women who served their country in the armed services and the immigrant families who fled Vietnam and came to Oklahoma seeking freedom and opportunity.

The story begins with a look at the family histories of Oklahomans who served in Vietnam. This opening section concludes with the stories of young people from those families who volunteered to serve their country in the armed services during the war.

The second section explores the roots of Vietnamese families that eventually relocated to Oklahoma. It also follows American military personnel and Vietnamese families onto the stage of war during the 1960s and 1970s. This includes stories of those in uniform, both American and Vietnamese, as well as stories of civilians whose lives were changed forever.

The next section tells the Vietnamese refugees' harrowing stories of escape as they left all they had known in their homeland to obtain safety, security, and opportunity in the United States. While they left under varying circumstances, they shared the common goal of a new life. The fourth and final section of the exhibit brings Oklahoma-born military personnel and immigrants back to Oklahoma, where their stories continue as they deal with challenges and seize opportunities. The exhibit provides a contemporary portrait of Oklahoma's diversity set against the backdrop of historic events.

In preparation for Welcome Home: Oklahomans and the War in Vietnam, the Oklahoma History Center transported a newly acquired Huey helicopter to Oklahoma City. This addition to the exhibit honors those who stepped up and served in the War in Vietnam and was donated by native Oklahoman Bob Ford, who said, "Any Army pilot or crew member who had the privilege to fly the Huey in combat loves it; it never let us down."

The aircraft came from Weatherford, Texas, escorted by the Oklahoma Patriot Guard Riders. The Huey was installed the following day and is suspended from the History Center atrium.

NewsOK.com shared more info about the exhibit in a recent article: 'Wall That Heals' and new exhibit explore Vietnam War's impact on local families.

Pictured above, left: First Lieutenant Bob Ford in Hue, South Vietnam, January 1968. Right: Ban Nguyen with his father and sister in South Vietnam. Ban is an operating partner of Jimmy's Egg restaurants, which is owned by his father-in-law Loc Le.




Smoke Over Oklahoma: The Railroad Photographs of Preston George

Explore the photography of Preston George and the historical importance of railroads in the exhibit Smoke Over Oklahoma: The Railroad Photographs of Preston George. On exhibit through March 2018 are twenty-five images of different railroad lines that passed through Oklahoma, such as the Katy and the Frisco, and the heavier duty locomotives of the Kansas City Southern and the Santa Fe lines. The exhibit also features images of various metro lines and trolleys. These images are included in a recent book by the same title, Smoke Over Oklahoma: the Railroad Photographs of Preston George by Augustus J. Veenendaal Jr. The book is available for purchase in the Oklahoma History Center Museum Store.



The Art of War: WWI Posters from the Oscar Jacobson Collection

This exhibit commemorates the 100th anniversary of the United States' entry into World War I on April 6, 1917. On display are twenty-two posters from the Oscar Jacobson Collection. Jacobson was the first director of the School of Art at the University of Oklahoma and the first director of the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. The poster was an integral tool for broad dissemination of information during World War I. Countries on both sides of the conflict distributed posters widely to garner support, urge action, and boost morale. During World War I, the impact of the poster as a means of communication was greater than at any other time during history. As a valuable historical research resource, the posters provide multiple points of view for understanding this global conflict. As artistic works, the posters range in style from graphically vibrant works by well-known designers to anonymous broadsides. The posters express various themes such as food issues (shortages and rationing), enlistment and recruitment ("Uncle Sam Wants You"), and finance (war bonds).

Prints of the various posters are available for purchase in the Museum Store.

This exhibit is located in the Chesapeake Events Center, which is used for public and private events and meetings. We recommend calling ahead to ensure the room will be open to the public the day of your visit. To contact the admissions desk, please call 405-522-0765.