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Traveling Exhibits

50 Years of Photojournalism at the Daily Oklahoman

Photojournalists have played an important role in the preservation and documentation of Oklahoma history. This exhibit features framed images from the Oklahoma Publishing Company from 1950 to 2000. Over 20 photographers, many from Oklahoma, are represented. The exhibit consists of fifty-six framed images produced by photographers of the Oklahoma Publishing Company from 1950 through 2000. Fifty-one of the images are 8" X 10" framed images and labels, five 16" X 20" images and labels (these five are enlarged duplicates of selected from the smaller images), one framed title panel, one framed credit panel and five decade overview scripts.

The exhibit travels in four separate crates with images packed per the described in an attached list.. This order must be maintained. Venue should allow for approximately eighty linear running feet for double hung exhibition. Exhibitor may choose option of not hanging duplicate, enlarged images, however it is preferred that all unduplicated images be included in exhibit. Rental fee for 50 Years of Photojournalism at the Daily Oklahoman is $250 in U.S. currency per each one (1) to eight (8) week venue with one week before and after for transport, exhibit set-up, and takedown. Exhibit fee is payable to the Oklahoma Museum of History and is due before delivery. Shipping fees are not included with the exhibition fee.

Cherokee Nation: A Portrait of a People

This exhibit presents fifty-five portraits of individuals, couples, and families by noted Oklahoma photographer and artist David Fitzgerald. The strikingly clear and visually rich photographs allow the viewer insight into elements in the broad spectrum of Cherokee life in Oklahoma today. Several of the individuals in these portraits are elders who have been named a Living National Treasure/Master Craftsperson. Whether the photographs depict settings associated with traditional practices or contemporary occupations, Fitzgerald's images convey his respect and affinity for the people who agreed to be represented in this project.

The Cherokees, the Ani Yun Wiya, or "real people," have made Oklahoma their home for nearly two centuries. But many still remember another homeland in the southern Appalachian Mountains as their ancestral home before they were forced west of the Mississippi River. Distantly related to the Six Nations of the Iroquois in the Northeast, Cherokee people believed that "The Great Spirit who is the father of the human family and to whom the whole earth belongs" gave them the hunting grounds and the river valleys of Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia. David Fitzgerald's remarkable photography provides a glimpse of a contemporary people tied, each in their own way, to a rich cultural past.

"I still live in the old ways and the belief of my ancestors, forefather and elders. I still believe in the sacred religious ceremonial grounds of long ago, which they say is long ago, but we still serve the same creator as our ancestors did. We still sing the same songs they sang long ago, but they are the very same songs as yesterday, tomorrow and forever. With these songs the creator gives us strength to go on day after day till he returns. Once again we will be as one. Take these words to your heart, to your home, wherever you go. If we don't meet here, with our prayers and guidance, we will meet at the creator's table, for there is no such thing as 'goodbye' in the Cherokee language, just see you later." Boss Cummings, Cherokee, U. S. Army Vietnam Veteran and Elder of the ROC Ceremonial Ground, 2001
"Like many people before me, I have found myself lost in the incredible history of the Cherokee people. Within these portraits lies the strength of a proud people regaining their national sovereignty that was tragically stripped from them in the 1800s, and then sadly repeated in the years that followed. The warmth and friendships shared with me over the past three years have become an experience I will cherish the rest of my life." David Fitzgerald, 2001

The exhibit consists of fifty-seven framed images produced by David Fitzgerald. Eleven of the images are 32" X 37.5" (includes one framed title panel and one artist biographical and image technical panel) and forty-six images are 22.75" X 26.5". There are nine framed interpretative panels which are 30.25" x 36.25". The exhibit travels in six separate crates with images packed per the described in attached list. This order must be maintained. Venue should allow for approximately 220 linear feet for single hung exhibition with interpretative panels. Exhibitor may choose other options of hanging the exhibit, however it is preferred that all images and panels be included in the exhibition. Rental fee for Cherokee Nation: A Portrait of a People is $1000 in U.S. currency per each one (1) to eight (8) week venue with one week before and after for transport, exhibit set-up, and takedown. Exhibit fee is payable to the Oklahoma Museum of History and is due before delivery. Shipping fees are not included with the exhibition fee.

Deep Deuce and Beyond: A Photographic Exhibition Exploring the Architectural Legacy of African Americans on Oklahoma City

This exhibition, featuring the photography of native Oklahoman Ron Tarver, explores the legacy of Deep Deuce through its architecture. From the grand historical edifice of Calvary Baptist Church to the clapboard frame of the Open Hand Mission, the images evoke the essence of the area, and the people who created it. Akin to Harlem of the 1930s, Deep Deuce spawned such legendary figures as jazz guitarist Charlie Christian, "blues shouter" Jimmy Rushing, and the internationally acclaimed writer, Ralph Ellison. Deep Deuce attracted African-American professionals of every stripe Roscoe Dunjee, Dr. Frederick Douglas Moon, Mrs. Lucy Tucker, Dr. William Lewis Haywood, Mary and Sydney Lyons. These doctors, educators, entrepreneurs, and activists came together, creating a critical mass that transformed 2nd Street and the surrounding neighborhood into a thriving corridor of Oklahoma City.

Born and raised in Fort Gibson, Oklahoma, photographer Ron Tarver has devoted much of his professional career to documenting the African American Experience. A staff photographer for the Philadelphia Inquirer for over 20 years, Tarver has earned numerous awards, grants, and fellowships, including: a 2001 Pew Fellowship in the Arts; the 2001 Margaret Danby Visual Arts Award from the Black Liberated Arts Center, Oklahoma City; and a 1993 Pennsylvania Council on the Arts grant to explore the lives of modern day African American cowboys.

This exhibit contains 26 framed photographic prints measuring 24x30" and 26 labels. The exhibit fee for Deep Deuce and Beyond is $250 in U.S. currency per each one (1) to eight (8) week venue with one week before and after for transport, exhibit set-up, and takedown. Exhibit fee is payable to the Oklahoma Museum of History and is due before delivery. Space requirement is a minimum of 80 linear feet of wall space for a single hung exhibit. Shipping is not included with the exhibition fee.

Black Hope Black Dreams

Black Hope Black Dreams features the accomplishments of three individuals who had vision for greater opportunity and equality for themselves and others. Their accomplishments opened doors and opened minds; their influence reached beyond their generations and their mortal lives. Edward (Edwin) Preston McCabe arrived in Oklahoma Territory in 1889. He was experienced in finance, law, land development, and politics. He sought a place where African Americans could establish their own towns similar to other groups of Americans. Roscoe Dunjee was a newspaperman, an activist, humanitarian, and a man of extraordinary conviction and legendary accomplishment. He was one of the most influential men in Oklahoma history as only one generation removed from slavery, he was a general on the battlefield for civil rights. Founded in 1915, Dunjee's newspaper was titled The Black Dispatch. He also took aim at the legal system and the issues, incidents and laws that deprived African Americans of their rights of citizenship and human dignity. Ada Lois (Sipuel) Fisher was the first African American admitted to the University of Oklahoma Law School on June 18, 1949, and the first to graduate in August 1951. Through her, African Americans succeeded in challenging the separate but equal doctrine as it applied to educational opportunities.

This exhibit consists of five (5) free-standing retractable banners with double-sided graphics. The minimum space requirement is 22x9'. It is shipped in one high-impact plastic case with wheels. The exhibit fee for Black Hope Black Dreams is $250 in U.S. currency per each one (1) to eight (8) week venue with one week before and after for transport, exhibit set-up, and takedown. Exhibit fee is payable to the Oklahoma Museum of History and is due before delivery. Space requirement is a minimum of 80 linear feet of wall space for a single hung exhibit. Shipping is not included with the exhibition fee.

For questions about rentable Oklahoma History Center exhibits or to schedule an exhibit, please contact:
Lori Oden
Curator of Exhibits
(405) 522-0780
loden@okhistory.org