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Preservation Conference Features Tribal Programs

Many tribal governments have established historic preservation programs, and some have assumed State Historic Preservation Office responsibilities for historic properties on their tribal lands as provided in the National Historic Preservation Act. The Tribal Historic Preservation Officer (THPO) is the official appointed by the governing authority of a tribe that has assumed all or any part of the responsibilities of the SHPO. The THPO title is often used for individuals administering cultural resource programs for tribes that have not assumed SHPO duties. Tribes play a critical role in the national preservation program.

Tribal preservation programs will be featured on Thursday, June 4, during one of the three tracks of sessions at Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma's 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference (Bartlesville, June 3-5). That morning, James Bird, Chief, Tribal Preservation Program, and Joe Watkins, Supervisory Anthropologist and Chief, Tribal Relations and American Cultures, both with the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, will discuss federal and tribal preservation partnerships. Valerie Hauser, Director, Office of Native American Affairs, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, will explain how the ACHP, the independent federal agency that administers the review of federal undertakings per the NHPA, works with tribes.

In the afternoon representatives of several Oklahoma tribes will talk about the challenges they face in protecting the places of special importance to them. They will also share their many successes and detail the programs they have initiated to document and preserve tribal heritage. These sessions offer an opportunity for Oklahoma's broad preservation community to learn about tribal concerns and to find ways to increase collaboration among all of the state's preservation partners.

For more information about the conference, contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO, at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org or Chris Wilson, Director, Downtown Bartlesville, Inc. at 918/766-4847 or cwilson@downtownbartlesvilleinc.org. Also, visit read the conference blog at http://okpreservationconference.wordpress.com.




Elm Street: It's Not Just Main Street for Neighborhoods

As we watch Main Street succeed in historic commercial district revitalization in dozens of Oklahoma towns and in hundreds of communities nationwide, local leaders wonder how to achieve similar results in residential areas. A featured session in Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma's 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference (Bartlesville, June 3-5) addresses the question.

Too many of the nation's urban neighborhoods have fallen into disrepair. Disinvestment, outmigration and aftershocks of urban renewal have left many of these history-rich communities battling for survival. Julie Fitzpatrick, Assistant Director/Special Projects Coordinator, Pennsylvania Downtown Center (PDC), will discuss her agency's Program (initiated in 2004) in “Elm Street: It's Not Just Main Street for Neighborhoods” on Thursday morning, June 4.

The PDC recognized that these "core communities" are a major untapped asset, and with help from an Elm Street program, these historic, authentic and unique neighborhoods can once again thrive, supporting the downtowns and commercial districts that they surround. Similar to the Four Point Main Street approach, the five point Elm Street approach includes safe, clean and green; neighbors and economy; design; image and identity; and sustainable organization (read more at http://www.padowntown.org).

At PDC, Julie facilitates community visioning, develops regional downtown revitalization strategies, establishes tourism infrastructure plans for heritage corridors, and develops business improvement district plans and other strategic planning activities. Currently, she is working with PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources on a project focused on Nature-Based Place-making. She joined the PDC in 2005, and has a master's degree in Community and Regional Planning and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History and Anthropology, all from Temple University.

For more information about the conference, contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO, at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org or Chris Wilson, Director, Downtown Bartlesville, Inc. at 918/766-4847 or cwilson@downtownbartlesvilleinc.org. Also, visit read the conference blog at http://okpreservationconference.wordpress.com.




TRADITION AND TRANSITION:
OKLAHOMA'S 27TH ANNUAL STATEWIDE PRESERVATION CONFERENCE

2015 STATEWIDE PRESERVATION CONFERENCE IN BARTLESVILLE

Save the dates, June 3-5, 2015, for Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma's 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. The special places we appreciate, protect, and adapt for new uses embody our traditions. A more diverse preservation community develops; what is considered significant evolves; and new preservation methods and strategies emerge. The conference program will address these topics during two plenary sessions and three concurrent tracks of sessions.

The first plenary session occurs on Wednesday afternoon, June 3, and the featured speaker is Stephanie K. Meeks, President, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C. She will discuss the NTHP's new initiatives and the benefits of preservation for all communities. Tim Samuelson, Cultural Historian, City of Chicago, Cultural Affairs & Special Events, Chicago, Illinois, addresses the second plenary session on Friday afternoon, June 5. He will present a lively discussion about the significance of modern architecture with a focus on the work of Frank Lloyd Wright and Bruce Goff.

The three concurrent tracks of sessions include:

TRACK A: Our Architectural Legacy - Featuring properties associated with the Phillips and other oil industry families, the designs of Frank Lloyd Wright, and resources of the recent past. Also, sessions highlight certified rehabilitations statewide and the Historic Preservation Certification Application process.

TRACK B: Preservation Challenges and Opportunities in the 21st Century - Spotlighting the work of the United Nations and its World Heritage List, the preservation work of tribal governments and Tribal Historic Preservation Offices in Oklahoma and the tribal programs of the National Park Service and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. Also, other federal agencies will share information about their cultural resource management efforts.

TRACK C: Main Streets and Neighborhoods - Celebrating the Oklahoma Main Street Program's 30th anniversary with a look back at its accomplishments and a look ahead to the challenges and opportunities for downtown redevelopment. Additionally, sessions focus on financial and other tools for revitalizing historic neighborhoods.

In addition to dozens of Oklahoma preservationists and the plenary speakers, special guest speakers include Antonio Aguilar, Technical Preservation Services Branch, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.; James Bird, Chief, Tribal Preservation Program, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.; Julie Fitzpatrick, Assistant Director/ Special Projects Coordinator, Pennsylvania Downtown Center, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Valerie Hauser, Director, Office of Native American Affairs, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C.; Susan Allen Kline, Independent Historic Preservation Consultant, Fort Worth, Texas; George C. Papagiannis, External Relations and Information, UNESCO, New York, New York; and Joe Watkins, Supervisory Anthropologist and Chief, Tribal Relations and American Cultures, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C.

Special events include the opening reception; local tours; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.’s annual meeting and luncheon; and the State Historic Preservation Office’s annual awards banquet.

Conference cosponsors include Oklahoma Historical Society, State Historic Preservation Office; Oklahoma Department of Commerce, Oklahoma Main Street Center; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.; Downtown Bartlesville Inc.; Bartlesville Area History Museum; Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce; Bartlesville Visitors Bureau; Bartlesville Redevelopment Trust Authority; City of Bartlesville; Price Tower Arts Center; and Washington County Historical Society.

Full conference program and registration information will be available in late April. Follow conference developments at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm; http://www.facebook.com/okshpo; http://www.twitter.com/okshpo; and http://www.okpreservationconference.wordpress.com.

If you have questions, contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO (405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org) or Chris Wilson, Director, Downtown Bartlesville, Inc. at 918/214-8500 or cwilson@downtownbartlesvilleinc.org.





NTHP President Speaks at Preservation Conference

One of the nation's leading preservationists, Stephanie K. Meeks, President of the National Trust for Historic Preservation will present “The Future of the Past: Reconceiving Historic Preservation for the 21st Century” in the opening plenary session for Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma's 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. It will be held June 3-5 in Bartlesville.

Meeks has been the president and chief executive officer of the NTHP since July 2010. Under her leadership, the organization has developed an ambitious strategic plan designed to refocus direct action on saving imperiled places, engage new audiences in preservation, and increase the organization's impact by a factor of ten. The NTHP is working to bring a more diverse and younger group of Americans into the preservation movement, and support their efforts in their communities and across the nation. It has also launched an effort to highlight the critical connection between older buildings and vibrant cities, and spearheaded research reflecting the benefits of historic preservation in today's urban areas.

Before joining the NTHP, Meeks held several senior executive positions with The Nature Conservancy; served as director of RARE, a U.S.-based conservation group that uses social marketing to address environmental challenges in communities around the world; and currently serves as Vice Chair of the Board of the Potomac Conservancy. She holds a B.A. in English from the University of Colorado and an MBA from George Washington University.

Full conference program and registration information will be available in late April. For more details, contact Melvena Heisch at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org.




Save the dates, June 3-5, 2015, for Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma's 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. The special places we appreciate, protect, and adapt for new uses embody our traditions. A more diverse preservation community develops; what is considered significant evolves; and new preservation methods and strategies emerge. The conference program will address these topics during two plenary sessions and three concurrent tracks of sessions.

Plenary session speakers include Stephanie K. Meeks, President, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C., and Tim Samuelson, Cultural Historian, City of Chicago, Cultural Affairs & Special Events, Chicago, Illinois.

The three concurrent tracks of sessions include:

TRACK A: Our Architectural Legacy - Featuring properties associated with the Phillips and other oil industry families; the designs of Frank Lloyd Wright; resources of the recent past; and the rehabilitation tax credits application process.

TRACK B: Preservation Challenges and Opportunities in the 21st Century - Spotlighting the work of the United Nations and its World Heritage List; the preservation work of tribal governments and Tribal Historic Preservation Offices in Oklahoma and the tribal programs of the National Park Service; Advisory Council on Historic Preservation; and other federal agencies.

TRACK C: Main Streets and Neighborhoods - Celebrating the Oklahoma Main Street Program's 30th anniversary with a look back at its accomplishments and a look ahead to the challenges and opportunities for downtown redevelopment. Additionally, sessions focus on financial and other tools for revitalizing historic neighborhoods.

Special events include the opening reception; local tours; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.'s annual meeting and luncheon; and the State Historic Preservation Office's annual awards banquet.

Conference cosponsors include Oklahoma Historical Society, State Historic Preservation Office; Oklahoma Department of Commerce, Oklahoma Main Street Center; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.; Downtown Bartlesville Inc.; Bartlesville Area History Museum; Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce; Bartlesville Visitors Bureau; Bartlesville Redevelopment Trust Authority; City of Bartlesville; Price Tower Arts Center; and Washington County Historical Society.

Full conference program and registration information will be available in late April. Follow conference developments at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm; http://www.facebook.com/okshpo; http://www.twitter.com/okshpo; and http://www.okpreservationconference.wordpress.com.