Follow OKSHPO on Twitter

OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY ROUTE 66 MOBILE TOUR STOP LIST

Stop #1, Coleman Theater, 103 North Main, Miami

The Coleman Theater was designed in the Spanish Colonial Revival architectural style, characterized by the outstanding twin bell towers on the south side, the unique spire-like bell tower in the center, and the ornately designed curvilinear gables on the façade. Additional Spanish Colonial Revival elements include the elaborately designed parapet walls, enriched cornice window heads, buff-colored stucco finish, and a red-tiled gabled roof on the western half. It continues to be one of the most impressive landmarks for Route 66 travelers. George L. Coleman, Sr., a mining magnate in northeast Oklahoma, constructed the elaborate theater for an estimated $600,000. It opened its doors on April 18, 1929, to a capacity crowd of 1600 people. Billed as the most opulent theater between Dallas and Kansas City, the Coleman opened during an era considered by Hollywood historians to be a watershed in movie theater history. It was a time when vaudeville was declining and talking motion pictures were on the rise. The Coleman was the only theater outside Oklahoma City and Tulsa that was a member of the prestigious Orpheum Circuit of Vaudeville Theaters. While vaudeville troops continued to appear on its massive stage, the owners also presented talking motion pictures from the very inception of the technology. Thanks to the dedication of local Miami citizens, the Coleman has undergone an extensive rehabilitation and continues to serve the community and the state as an important entertainment venue.

Stop #2, Miami Downtown Historic District, roughly bounded by 100 block of North Main, and the zero blocks of South Main, Central Avenue, & Southeast "A" Street, Miami

The Miami Downtown Historic District is the community's historic commercial core. It consists primarily of the buildings along Main Street, the alignment of Route 66, with a few located on side streets. Most of the buildings in the district were constructed between 1902 and 1958 and were designed in the Commercial style of architecture with a few examples of Art Deco and other styles. In the mid-1960s, an urban renewal project resulted in the demolition of numerous buildings along "A" Streets East and West to provide parking lots. Also at that time, the original configuration of Main Street was altered to allow diagonal parking and a serpentine traffic flow pattern; it was anticipated that the new design would encourage consumers to continue making downtown Miami their shopping destination. However, these changes did not have the desired effect, and the traditional pattern of Main Street was recently restored. Twenty-nine buildings, including the magnificent Coleman Theater, contribute to the character of the district.

Stop #3, Miami Marathon Oil Company Service Station, 331 South Main, Miami

Located on a prominent corner of Main Street, the Miami Marathon Oil Company Service Station was built in 1929 to serve local customers and Route 66 travelers. This one-story station is an example of the house with canopy type, and its design incorporates elements of the Neoclassical Revival style which came to symbolize the Company. A triangular pediment and classical columns form the service bay, giving the station the appearance of a miniature Greek temple. This "service station" type became popular in the late 1920s and early 1930s as oil companies strived to incorporate their industry into residential neighborhoods. Executives believed that the type projected a feeling of a "safe-haven" for Route 66 travelers.

Stop #4, Riviera Courts-Holiday Motel, 1 mile west of Main on US 69A, Miami vicinity

Ideally located west of Miami on a curve in Route 66, less than a mile beyond the Neosho River Bridge, the Riviera Courts offered travelers a convenient place to stop for comfortable lodging. The motor court followed the era of tourist camps and cabins and preceeded the development of the modern motel. Motor courts were similar to cottage courts except that room units were integrated under single rooflines usually as one building. When they were arranged in a U or V, the interior courtyard served as a common space for guests or for children's play areas. The Riviera Courts is a single building with a continuous roof, and the units are arranged in a wide V pattern. Garages separate the units. The office and the manager's residence are located inside the courtyard and are separated with a set of swings for children. Constructed in 1937, the Riviera Courts featured gleaming white exterior walls and a fortress-like appearance that caught the eye of motorists on the Mother Road.

Stop #5, Miami Original Nine-Foot Section of Route 66 Roadbed, from Junction of "E" Southwest & 130th to Highway 66, Miami vicinity, (Ends, Stop #6)

Construction of this roadbed segment occurred between 1919 and 1921, and it opened to traffic on March 1, 1922. It is representative of the first efforts to address the increased popularity of the automobile. A network of hard-surfaced, permanent roads was greatly needed, and as the Good Roads Movement gained momentum, U. S. 66 was officially designated in 1926 to meet this need. This roadbed segment, originally designated State Highway 7, became part of the original alignment of the new federal highway. The nine foot wide, three mile stretch of historic Route 66 is located in a rural setting three miles south and one-half mile west of the intersection of Route 66 and State Highway 125. It has five feet wide gravel shoulders, and since 1984, loose gravel has been spread across the roadbed. However, the original paving and curbing is still visible.

Stop #6, Miami Original Nine-Foot Section of Route 66 Roadbed, from Junction of "E" Southwest & 130th to Highway 66, Miami vicinity, (Begins, Stop #5)

Construction of this roadbed segment occurred between 1919 and 1921, and it opened to traffic on March 1, 1922. It is representative of the first efforts to address the increased popularity of the automobile. A network of hard-surfaced, permanent roads was greatly needed, and as the Good Roads Movement gained momentum, U. S. 66 was officially designated in 1926 to meet this need. This roadbed segment, originally designated State Highway 7, became part of the original alignment of the new federal highway. The nine foot wide, three mile stretch of historic Route 66 is located in a rural setting three miles south and one-half mile west of the intersection of Route 66 and State Highway 125. It has five feet wide gravel shoulders, and since 1984, loose gravel has been spread across the roadbed. However, the original paving and curbing is still visible.

Stop #7, Former location, Narcissa D-X Gas Station, 15050 South State Highway 69, Miami Vicinity (Demolished after listing in the National Register of Historic Places)

At the time of its listing in the National Register of Historic Places, the Narcissa D-X Gas Station constituted the primary building remaining in the once thriving community of Narcissa, located south of Miami on Route 66. The town was incorporated in 1902, a year after the Frisco Railroad was built through the area. Brothers, James Henry and Frank Gaines built a grain elevator on the railroad, and within a few years, the town had a drug store, three general stores, and a blacksmith. When U.S. 66 was designated in 1926, it ran through Narcissa, but the alignment lay a quarter of a mile east of the railroad tracks. The town's businesses began to shift from the railroad to the new highway. Following this trend, the DX Gas Station's owners moved it from its original location to Route 66 in 1936. It remained in operation until the 1990s. Modified through time, the station was a long rectangular building with a projecting hipped roof of asphalt shingles which formed the porte-cochere over the pump filling area. A projecting brick chimney rose from the north slope of the building.

Stop #8, Horse Creek Bridge, Junction of Highway 66 & Horse Creek, Afton vicinity

Built in 1936 during the heart of the Great Depression, the Horse Creek Bridge reflects the town of Afton's growth and anticipated expansion to the northeast across the creek. The bridge design accommodated both pedestrian and vehicular traffic with walkways and reinforced concrete guard rails constructed on either side of the bridge. According to the Oklahoma Department of Transportation, Horse Creek Bridge is one of the few remaining bridges that utilized dual pedestrian walkways. The two-lane Horse Creek Bridge is a reinforced concrete, steel girder structure. It consists of three spans, the shortest measuring forty feet, the longest, sixty feet. The total span is one-hundred and forty feet. A series of three steel I-beam girders support the concrete deck of the bridge. The girders are supported by an underpinning of two steel piers encased in concrete.

Stop #9, Former location, Cities Service Station, Junction of First & Central Avenue, Afton (Demolished after listing in the National Register of Historic Places)

The Cities Service Station was constructed in 1933 at Central Avenue and First Street in downtown Afton. Cities Service Oil and Gas Company prospered in the early to mid twentieth century, even during the Great Depression of the 1930s. The company's reported earnings dropped only two percent in 1933. Perhaps some of the company's success can be attributed to its innovation in customer service. Before 1930, few service stations provided restrooms for their customers. But Cities Service included two such facilities, one on each end of the main building of its new stations, including this location. The station was an example of a vernacular interpretation of the Mission Revival style of architecture. The building's exterior was roughly textured stucco, and it had an extended canopy with arches in each elevation. Galvanized tin pent roofs with a Spanish tile pattern were located on either side of the canopy. Loss of this service station reminds us of just how fragile our links to the history of Route 66 can be.

Stop #10, McDougal Filling Station, 443956 East State Highway 60 (3 miles east of Vinita)

The McDougal Filling Station is a house-type service station and was constructed in 1940 on Route 66 east of Vinita. The distinctive wood-frame building exhibits a sandstone veneer known as Giraffe Stone, a patchwork of light and dark colored sandstone with a pattern of dark colored mortar joints. This pattern is most commonly found in the Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri region. The gabled roof has red asphalt shingles and exposed rafter tails on the overhanging eaves on the east and west. A chimney pierces the ridge of the roof on the north end. The station was an independent operation and not associated with a particular gasoline brand, and such stations were among the first to suffer when I-44 diverted traffic from Route 66. The gasoline rationing and travel restrictions of the war years made it difficult for independent stations to survive, but the McDougal's were successful. The McDougal Filling Station is a significant example of how Route 66 supported the development of small local businesses after World War II, as well as the burgeoning national economy symbolized by the explosion in the automobile industry.

Stop #11, Little Cabin Creek Bridge, carries US 60/69 over Little Cabin Creek, one and one-half miles southeast of Vinita and approximately one mile southeast of Interstate 44 [Will Rogers Turnpike]

Constructed in 1934-35, the Little Cabin Creek Bridge carried US Highway 66 over Little Cabin Creek until 1970. A bucolic rural landscape of a wooded stream valley, green pasture, cultivated fields, and a pecan grove comprise the bridge's setting. It is 388 feet in length and combines a 95-foot Parker Pony Truss with eight steel stringer I-beam approach spans, each 36 feet long. The bridge's driving surface width (between the curbs) is 24 feet, and the total width inclusive of curbs and guardrail is 25 feet. The steel stringer approach spans have a concrete post-and-beam guardrail, while the guardrail on the truss is a pair of I-shaped beams. The bridge has had no alterations other than minor repair work.

Stop #12, Hotel Vinita, 106 West Canadian, Vinita

The Hotel Vinita was constructed in 1930 in the heart of downtown, just four years after the new U. S. 66 was designated. The hotel's design incorporates elements of the Spanish Colonial and Baroque styles. Unlike earlier hotels constructed to serve railroad passengers, the Hotel Vinita was located on the new federal highway to cater to the businessmen traveling by automobile.

Stop #13, Randall Tire Company, 237 South Wilson, Vinita

The Randall Tire Company served locals and travelers on Route 66. This distinctive building, constructed in 1931, features walls of random stone, a sawtooth parapet wall of rubble stone, and fenestration surrounded with brick.

Stop #14, Former location, Spraker Service Station, 240 South Wilson, Vinita (Demolished after listing in the National Register of Historic Places)

The one-story brick Spraker Service Station was an excellent example of the Tudor Revival style service station built by the Continental Oil Company in the 1920s and 1930s for sale of its Conoco gasoline products. The station was historically significant for its association with Route 66 and as an example of how companies tried to attract the motoring public through a positive and recognizable image. The building had a steeply pitched side-gabled roof combined with a front-facing gable. Faced with both dark and light colored brick, the dark brick formed a three foot band around the lower half of the building; the light brick extended into the gable ends. Built about 1927, the station was virtually unchanged, with the exception of the garage door and window replacements, at the time of its listing in the National Register.

Stop #15, Pryor Creek Bridge, carries First Street over Pryor Creek, Southwest of Junction with State Highway 66, Chelsea vicinity

The Pryor Creek Bridge is located in Rogers County approximately a quarter of a mile east of the small town of Chelsea. This single span, modified Pratt Through Truss bridge was constructed in 1926 and carried First Street, which was part of the original alignment of US 66. A Through Truss bridge has beams bracing it above the roadway, so that vehicles travel through it as through a tunnel. This design was selected when conditions for construction required the use of long spans. The Pryor Creek Bridge is 123 feet in length, with a total width of 19 feet and a curb-to-curb with of 18 feet. The defining features of a Pratt Truss are a top cord that is flat extending below the topmost beam, vertical beams that carry compressive (pushed together) forces, and diagonal beams that carry tensile (pulled apart) forces. Early Pratt Trusses in Oklahoma were lightweight, their main junctures were pin-connected, and they were most often built by bridge companies for county commissioners throughout the state. By the 1920s, the increase in automobile traffic and the need for heavier bridges to carry the greater loads resulted in changes in bridge design. The Pryor Creek Bridge carried Route 66 traffic until 1932.

Stop #16, Chelsea Motel, Northeast corner of First Street & State Highway 66, Chelsea

Ideally located for serving Route 66 travelers, the Chelsea Motel, built about 1936, is a simple rectangular building about 75 feet long on its west elevation and 16 feet deep on its south elevation, divided into six motel units. The motel faces west in a triangular piece of land formed by the intersection of First Street and Route 66. The motel is of wood construction (in fact, using patterned lumber ordinarily used on interior walls) on the west elevation, with stucco applied to the other elevations. The most impressive feature of the motel was the spectacular neon sign installed about 1947. The Chelsea Motel is representative of the multitude of now anonymous mom and pop motels that proliferated Route 66 into the 1950s. But, a combination of forces soon took their toll. Their numbers tripled between about 1946 and 1953, and there was ever-increasing pressure to provide the latest amenities, including air conditioning and telephones. The Chelsea Motel responded to these demands. But it was difficult to compete with the rising tide of motel chains and the tremendous increases in traffic which called for improvements to Route 66 and, finally, its replacement. In the 1950s, the Turner Turnpike and the Will Rogers Turnpike, eventually Interstate-44, pulled the traffic and the business from the historic highway and the small towns. The Chelsea Motel closed in 1976.

Stop #17, Ed Galloway's Totem Pole Park, State Highway 28A, 3.5 miles East of Highway 66, Foyil vicinity

Ed Galloway's Totem Pole Park is located on Oklahoma State Highway 28A, at a point 3.5 miles east of U.S. 66. This folk art environment was one of the most popular side trips for tourists driving the historic highway. The 1.4-acre historic district contains a residential area, a totem park area, and a picnic and museum area. Ed Galloway was one of Oklahoma's premier folk artists. His art objects are made of stone or concrete, reinforced with steel rebar and wood. They are incised and carved in bas-relief. Painted, decorative elements of the creations include representational and figurative images of birds and Native Americans of the Northwest Coast, Alaska, and Plains cultures. Significant objects include the 1937-1948 ninety-foot main Totem Pole, which is heavily incised and carved in bas-relief with numerous projections. Other totems include a pre-1955 Arrowhead Totem, a Birdbath Totem dating from about 1955, and a tree Totem dating circa 1955-1961.

Stop #18, Will Rogers Hotel, 524 West Will Rogers Boulevard, Claremore

Constructed in 1930, Claremore's Will Rogers Hotel is a six-story, rectangular building designed in the Spanish Colonial Revival style. It stands at the intersection of Lynn Riggs Avenue and Will Rogers Boulevard in the central business district and fronts onto the Mother Road. The elegant exterior consists of two-tone buff brick, stucco, terra cotta, and clay tile. Interior decorative elements exhibit influences from the American Southwest. A coffee shop, a drug store, a barber shop, a beauty shop, and a Montgomery Ward's department store were located on the hotel's first floor. The second floor mezzanine was the location of the ballroom as well as guest rooms. Floors three through five were dedicated to guest rooms, and the sixth floor was devoted to the hot mineral water baths, shower rooms, massage rooms, and a sun deck. Mineral baths attracted large numbers of visitors to Claremore, and the Will Rogers Hotel was the last and largest of the hotels constructed in Claremore connected to this economic development venture. The hotel closed in the early 1980s and sat vacant for several years. Then, in the early 1990s, it was sensitively rehabilitated and converted to senior housing.

Stop #19, Former location, Claremore Auto Dealership, 625 West Will Rogers Boulevard, Claremore (Demolished after listing in the National Register of Historic Places)

Built about 1930, the Claremore Auto Dealership was a one story, L-shaped building designed in the Pueblo Deco style, a vernacular interpretation of Art Deco. It was located on a large corner lot on the west side of Claremore on U.S. 66. L-shaped commercial buildings were introduced in the late 1920s to accommodate parking for the growing number of automobiles. Initially, people parked their cars along the street or in alleys, but parking lots soon appeared as the number of automobiles increased. The L-shape allowed the business to front two commercial streets and/or incorporate parking lots into the design for their facilities. The Claremore Auto Dealership exhibited both of these design trends. Pueblo Deco features of the building included a stucco exterior, a diamond and ziggurat motif, a crenelated parapet, and clay tile. A canted entrance on the northwest corner provided the focal point of the building. The corners of the building were accentuated with stucco pilasters which rose above the parapet to create a crenelated appearance. Between the pilasters, along the parapet wall, was red clay tile roof coping. A decorative tile pattern ran the length of each bay and down the pilasters to the top of the windows, creating a rectangular pattern. Within each rectangle was a row of diamond shaped tiles.

Stop #20, Sinclair Service Station, 3501 East Eleventh, Tulsa

The Sinclair Service Station, built in 1929, is an excellent example of the house with service bay station type, and it consists of an office, covered pump station, and a double service bay. The station possesses design characteristics of the Spanish Eclectic style, including a stucco exterior, a triangular parapet, and a clay-tile visor roof. Massive stucco columns support the porte-cochere. The upper corners of each of the three openings into the pump area have decorative, stucco detailing. The open pump station retains the original pressed-tin ceiling. Popular in the Southwest United States, the Spanish Eclectic station was comparable to the other domestic forms including the Tudor Revival cottage-type. These stations were eye-catching to the traveling public, who identified particular architectural designs with specific brands, like the Spanish Eclectic style with Sinclair.

Stop #21, Casa Loma Hotel, 2626-2648 East Eleventh, Tulsa

The 1927 Casa Loma Hotel building fills an entire half-block along East Eleventh Street and Columbia Avenue. Because Eleventh Street was paved and the Eleventh Street Bridge provided a convenient crossing of the Arkansas River, the original alignment of U.S. 66 was moved to Eleventh Street in 1933. Like many businesses along the historic highway, the Casa Loma Hotel served local customers and travelers too. Constructed for both hotel and commercial space, the Casa Loma hosted overnight guests on the second floor and local shoppers in the drugstores, restaurants, beauty and barber shops, and grocery store on the first floor. The hotel is an excellent example of the Mission/Spanish Colonial Revival architectural style so popular for commercial building design in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Outstanding features of the building include the short towers at the end facades visually anchoring it to the street corners, the S-shaped clay tile and hipped-roof towers, scrolls, twisted engaged columns, sharp parapets, decorative cartouche and balconet over the entry. A recent rehabilitation of the Casa Loma ensures it will continue to play an important role in Tulsa's economy and serve as a landmark on the Mother Road.

Stop #22, Whittier Square Historic District, roughly between Lewis Avenue, Zunis Avenue, East First, & Interstate 244, Tulsa

The Whittier Square Historic District is a seven-block area that lies east of downtown Tulsa. It is significant as Tulsa's first suburban shopping center, and the district's primary period of growth and development was from 1914 to 1965. A 1939 Oklahoma Academy of Science research publication identified Whittier Square as a significant retailing center, and at the time as a home for more than 100 businesses providing a wide range of goods and services. Tulsa's population jumped from 1,390 in 1900 to over 72,000 in 1930 and Tulsa was proclaiming itself "The Oil Capitol of the World." The city's demand for housing and commerce increased dramatically during the city's oil boom days of the nineteen-teens and twenties. This economic boom contributed greatly to the development of Whittier Square, and the district also benefited from the Route 66 traffic that passed through it. The Phillips 66 Station at Stop #23 is an example of this commercial activity.

Stop #23, Phillips 66 Station #473, 2224 East Admiral Boulevard, Tulsa

Constructed in 1929, in an era of small, independently owned, gas stations, this Phillips station was not the average business, and indeed represented new directions in commerce. It was part of a large chain of gas stations, a relatively new phenomenon in American business, and one that met with a mixed public reaction. Phillips Petroleum Company sought to generate service stations that would, by their very construction and design, convey an identity associated with its brand. The cottage style that Phillips adopted accomplished this goal. The station originally consisted of a simple tiny cottage with a front chimney. Then in 1941, a garage and service bay were added to the west elevation. The station is near the Whittier Square Historic District, found at Stop #22.

Stop #24, Blue Dome Historic District, roughly between South Kenosha Avenue & South Detroit Avenue, Frisco Railroad Tracks & East 8th, Tulsa

Historic Route 66 passes through the Blue Dome Historic District, a seventeen-block area that lies just east of Tulsa's central business district. The Historic District gets its name from the eclectic Blue Dome Building at the southwest corner of East 2nd Street and South Elgin Avenue. A concrete dome tops the distinctive circular buff-brick structure. Small round-arch lanterns rise out of each roof elevation. A ribbed domed cupola on spindles tops the domed roof. Small-scale commercial buildings and large warehouses and industrial facilities, the first constructed in 1906, are found in the district. It also includes four residential properties, two single-family dwellings and two apartment buildings. In addition to its association with Route 66, the District has historical ties to the arrival of the Midland Valley and Santa Fe Railroads in 1903 and 1905. The strategic location of the Blue Dome Historic District to the railroads was critical to Tulsa's economic growth from 1903 until 1965 when the Santa Fe Railroad removed its track and the Midland Valley line was sold.

Stop #25, Vickery Phillips 66 Station, 602 South Elgin, Tulsa

The Vickery Phillips 66 Gasoline Station is a Cottage type service station, the type Phillips 66 Oil Company used in its efforts in the late 1920s and early 1930s to make its stations both attractive and uniform in appearance. While the gas stations followed closely a common style and design, some variation occurred especially with the construction of service bays. This station has two separate buildings, one for the office and one for the service bays. The characteristics of the Cottage Style evident with this building are the central section flanked by large multi-light casement windows, a graceful arch over the entrance constructed of soldier-coursed bricks and a circular insert in the chimney. Although Phillips was not the first oil company to use the cottage design for its stations, it was possibly the most pervasive in its application, and especially so in Oklahoma and this region. The cottage type was used to help the commercial gasoline operation blend into, and be accepted by, residential neighborhoods. It also unmistakably communicated a corporate image and Route 66 provided the perfect place for Phillips to promote their image.

Stop #26, Eleventh Street Arkansas River Bridge, Highway 66 over the Arkansas River, Tulsa

The Eleventh Street Arkansas River Bridge is a concrete arch bridge with eighteen spans. It was constructed in 1916-1917 and carried traffic from Tulsa to the West Tulsa oil fields and refineries. It has a thirty-four foot wide roadbed and is 1,470.6 feet long. The original design included a classical balustrade and Victorian-era lighting. In 1929, the guardrails and lighting fixtures were replaced with decorative elements exhibiting an Art Deco ziggurat motif. Then, to meet the demands of increased traffic, in 1935, the roadbed was widened by decreasing the width of the walkways along the sides of the roadbed from four feet to two feet, a project of the Works Progress Administration. Although vacated when the Interstate highway was constructed, the Eleventh Street Bridge retains its overall, significant design features and remains a prominent landmark on historic Route 66 through Tulsa.

Stop #27, Cities Service Station #8, 1648 Southwest Boulevard, Tulsa

Oil was fueling Tulsa's rapid growth in the 1920s, and the designation of U. S. 66 in 1926 contributed to the development of local businesses too. Constructed late that same year, the Cities Service Station #8 was located on a site with easy access from three streets, and it drew local traffic as well as travelers on the historic highway. The proximity to the Eleventh Street Bridge which carried Route 66 across the Arkansas River ensured a steady flow of customers. The bridge is Stop #26 on this tour. The Cities Service Station is an excellent example of the oblong box form which replaced the house-type of gas station. Influenced by the International style, stations like this one were less adorned than the earlier types and were characterized by clean lines, shiny finishes, and functional design.

Stop #28, Former location, 66 Motel, 3660 Southwest Boulevard, Tulsa (Demolished after listing in the National Register of Historic Places)

The 66 Motel, constructed circa 1933, was located at 3512 Southwest Boulevard, part of the original alignment of U.S. Route 66. The motel's design was a vernacular interpretation of the Moderne style. Created to glorify the "machine age," the style was influenced by ship, airplane, and automobile designs, and it was popular for the design of roadside buildings from 1920 to 1940. Characteristics of the style present in the 66 Motel were the stucco exterior stepped parapet and a projecting, offset front entry. The building's rounded corners were in-filled with glass block. Motels were some of the most distinctive landmarks along the historic highway, and they are disappearing at an alarming rate.

Stop #29, Sapulpa Downtown Historic District, roughly bounded by Hobson Avenue, Elm, Lee Avenue, & Main, Sapulpa

The Sapulpa Downtown Historic District is this Route 66 town's commercial core. It encompasses roughly a nine block area in the original town-site. Over ninety percent of the buildings were constructed between 1904 and 1952. Sapulpa began as an important railroad town with a roundhouse, a dispatcher's office, a Harvey House restaurant, and repair shops and yards for the Frisco Railway. At its peak in the 1920s, the Frisco employed over 700 men in the community and was its major economic force until 1927 when the company moved its division operations to Tulsa. Following the opening of the famous Glenn Pool Oil field in 1905, construction of substantial brick commercial buildings rapidly increased. The majority were designed in the Commercial Style with Classical Revival and Tudor Revival styles also represented. Prominent non-commercial buildings in the district include the Creek County Courthouse, the historic Public Library, and the U. S. Post Office. Sapulpa's economy greatly benefited from the 1926 designation of U. S. Highway 66 which ran through the heart of the downtown commercial district.

Stop #30, West Sapulpa Route 66 Roadbed, Junction of Ozark Trail & State Highway 66 .25 miles West of Sahoma Lake Road, Sapulpa vicinity (Ends, Stop #32)

In 1915, the unpaved road from Sapulpa to Bristow was designated part of the Ozark Trail System. The designation was intended to promote travel and tourism. Then, in 1924, the Creek County commissioners petitioned the State of Oklahoma to pave the road, and the work was completed in 1925. When US 66 was designated in 1926, this 3.3 mile stretch of newly paved roadbed became a part of America's Main Street. But, in 1952, Route 66 was realigned, bypassing this historic stretch of highway and turning it into a corridor for local traffic. Remaining historic features of the roadway include the roadbed, a box drain, a concrete guardrail and retaining wall, and a railroad trestle. Today it serves as a reminder of the past, when a brick-decked bridge represented the acme of construction, when the roadway meandered gracefully through the countryside instead of dominating the landscape, when an eighteen-foot wide roadway amply accommodated two-way traffic, and when the traveling was as much a part of the trip as was the destination.

Stop #31, Bridge No. 18 at Rock Creek, Junction State Highway 66 and Rock Creek, Sapulpa vicinity

The Rock Creek Bridge, constructed in 1924, is located just southwest of Sapulpa and is an excellent example of a Parker Through Truss bridge. Built as part of the Ozark Trail, it became an official Route 66 bridge in 1926. At one-hundred and twenty feet long and eighteen feet wide, the Rock Creek Bridge is characterized by a steel truss with a polygonal top cord and a compound truss to achieve the long span needed at the crossing. Members of the truss are built-up in lattice sections. One unusual feature of this bridge is its brick deck. Route 66 was realigned in 1952, and the Rock Creek Bridge and its roadbed segment were bypassed. The concrete bridge constructed on the new alignment exemplified the latest technology in bridge construction. The Bridge #18 at Rock Creek remains an impressive example of the many steel truss bridges that were once found along the length of the historic highway.

Stop #32, West Sapulpa Route 66 Roadbed, Junction of Ozark Trail & State Highway 66, .25 miles West of Sahoma Lake Road, Sapulpa vicinity (Begins, Stop #30)

In 1915, the unpaved road from Sapulpa to Bristow was designated part of the Ozark Trail System. The designation was intended to promote travel and tourism. Then, in 1924, the Creek County commissioners petitioned the State of Oklahoma to pave the road, and the work was completed in 1925. When US 66 was designated in 1926, this 3.3 mile stretch of newly paved roadbed became a part of America's Main Street. But, in 1952, Route 66 was realigned, bypassing this historic stretch of highway and turning it into a corridor for local traffic. Remaining historic features of the roadway include the roadbed, a box drain, a concrete guardrail and retaining wall, and a railroad trestle. Today it serves as a reminder of the past, when a brick-decked bridge represented the acme of construction, when the roadway meandered gracefully through the countryside instead of dominating the landscape, when an eighteen-foot wide roadway amply accommodated two-way traffic, and when the traveling was as much a part of the trip as was the destination.

Stop #33, Tank Farm Loop Route 66 Roadbed, Junction of State Highway 66 & Old Highway 66, .6 mile West of Interstate 44 Overpass, Bristow vicinity (Ends, Stop #34)

The Route 66 roadbed segment known as the Tank Farm Loop was constructed in 1925. It begins at the junction of SH 66 and Old Highway 66, approximately six-tenths of a mile west of the Interstate 44 overpass. The Bristow-Sapulpa Road, which included the path of the Tank Farm Loop, was a product of the forces that brought about social and economic change in the area. With the Glenn Pool oil field boosting commerce in Creek County and with other discoveries in the Bristow vicinity, traffic rapidly increased on the road which was incorporated into the Ozark Trail system by 1915. In 1924, the Creek County Commissioners proposed that the State of Oklahoma pave this segment of the Ozark Trail, and the work was completed in 1925. The roadbed, constructed of Portland Cement, measures eighteen feet wide. At the time of its construction, the concrete was poured in fifty foot, ten-inch thick sections. When US 66 was designated in 1926, only twelve percent of Oklahoma roads were paved.

Stop #34, Tank Farm Loop Route 66 Roadbed, Junction of State Highway 66 & Old Highway 66, .6 mile West of Interstate 44 Overpass, Bristow vicinity (Begins, Stop #33)

The Route 66 roadbed segment known as the Tank Farm Loop was constructed in 1925. It begins at the junction of SH 66 and Old Highway 66, approximately six-tenths of a mile west of the Interstate 44 overpass. The Bristow-Sapulpa Road, which included the path of the Tank Farm Loop, was a product of the forces that brought about social and economic change in the area. With the Glenn Pool oil field boosting commerce in Creek County and with other discoveries in the Bristow vicinity, traffic rapidly increased on the road which was incorporated into the Ozark Trail system by 1915. In 1924, the Creek County Commissioners proposed that the State of Oklahoma pave this segment of the Ozark Trail, and the work was completed in 1925. The roadbed, constructed of Portland Cement, measures eighteen feet wide. At the time of its construction, the concrete was poured in fifty foot, ten-inch thick sections. When US 66 was designated in 1926, only twelve percent of Oklahoma roads were paved.

Stop #35, Bristow Motor Company Building, 500 North Main, Bristow

The Bristow Motor Company Building was constructed in 1923 and was the location of Creek County's first automotive dealership. This sales and service center catered to the growing number of local customers in the mid-1920s and to the numerous Route 66 travelers. Representative of automotive dealership building designs across the country; it is a one-story, red brick and limestone Commercial style building on the corner of North Main and West 10th in downtown Bristow. The building is divided horizontally by a stringcourse of limestone, which separates the storefronts from the upper brick wall. The two facades which face Main and West 10th Avenue are almost identical and combine brick, glass and decorative limestone in a typical 1920s commercial design. Although the original storefronts and display windows have been replaced with glass and aluminum, the Bristow Motor Company Building continues to maintain its architectural integrity. Typical of such businesses, the large storefront windows made it easy for passers-by, whether walking or driving down the street, to see the dealer's new cars.

Stop #36, Bristow Firestone Service Station, 321 North Main, Bristow

The Bristow Firestone Service Station is significant for its association with Route 66 and for its Art Deco architectural style. It is an L-shaped, single-story building constructed of randomly patterned bricks of multiple, but predominantly light colors. Although the building is made of brick instead of stucco, which was commonly used in Art Deco designs, the subtle zigzags and the stair-stepping in the window molding and the strong geometric motifs in the strikingly angular façade of the station place it squarely in that style. The pilasters and parapet of uneven height enhance the vertical appearance of what is really a single-story building. This distinctive, modernistic design reverberated all along Route 66. An elaborate station, the building is also large, about eighty-five feet on its east elevation and about seventy feet on the north elevation, with a spacious office, and four service bays. A concrete apron reaches from the front of the store and service bays to the street. The gasoline pump islands have been removed but a steel pole that once displayed a sign for the operation remains on the apron near the street. Although the historic building is no longer a service station, it has been rehabilitated and is now the Bristow Body Shop.

Stop #37, Beard Motor Company, 210 East 9th, Bristow

The Beard Motor Company opened in Bristow in 1947. The company sold automobiles and gasoline and provided repair services for local customers and those traveling Route 66. When the U.S. Bureau of Public Roads in November 1926 designated a national highway system, the network used existing roadways instead of planning new highways where none had existed. A large section of Route 66 through Oklahoma utilized the Ozark Trail system, including that which ran through Bristow's business district. Bristow's Main Street became part of "The Main Street of America." Capturing the spirit of the post-World War II era, the Beard Motor Company was designed in the Art Moderne style emphasized by curved corners and blue tile enhancements to provide linear detail against light brick. The primary roof is flat, and the service area roof is arched. The sliding doors gave this section the appearance of an aircraft hangar. Visible from Route 66 two blocks away and separate from the building is the signature 75 foot tower featuring the words CHRYSLER and PLYMOUTH. The tower reflects the association with the oil industry and utilizes some of the same design principles for drilling rigs that replaced earlier oil field technologies in the post-World War II period.

Stop #38, Bristow Tire Shop, 115 West 4th, Bristow

The Bristow Tire Shop is a one story, brick building situated on the corner of Fourth Street and Main Street on the edge of downtown Bristow, a perfect location to accommodate travelers on Route 66, the most used east-west transcontinental highway. The building's architecture reflects elements of the Italian Renaissance Revival style, popular through the mid-1920s, including the hipped tin roof clad in simulated clay tiles and the arched windows. The building consists of a small, square, brick office and a two-pump station both incorporated under the hipped roof. The most prominent feature of the shop is the original service bay, which extends from the front of the office. Massive brick columns support the porte cochere. The design qualities reflect the trend of the times for city improvement commissions to pressure business owners to construct structurally sound and attractive buildings.

Stop #39, Texaco Service Station, 201 West 4th, Bristow

Built in 1923, on the northwest corner of Fourth and Elm Streets, the Texaco Service Station was substantially altered after its listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Originally, the station was a rectangular one-story L-shaped stucco building and was an excellent early example of a Moderne style "house with bays" service station. Characteristics of this design include the residential style station with a small office and restrooms, an extended canopy and two front-facing service bays, smooth stucco surface and projections above the roof line giving it a vertical appearance. A central feature of the Texaco Service Station was a streamline canopy supported by two steel columns and surrounded by three bands at the roof line. A stucco belt course composed of three raised red stripes defined the base of the parapet wall. The Moderne style became popular in the United States around 1920, and its application to this service station presented an up-to-date image for Texaco as it competed for local customers and those traveling the "Mother Road."

Stop #40, Little Deep Fork Creek Bridge, .33 mile East of Junction of County Roads #E0830 & #N3700, Bristow vicinity

Built in 1914, the bridge over Little Deep Fork Creek is a rare, surviving example of the Bedstead type bridge and is historically significant for its association with the Ozark Trail, as well as with Route 66. The Ozark Trail Association, a private organization that promoted the improvement of roads, officially designated the section of road that includes the bridge as part of its system in 1915. Then, in 1926, the U.S. Bureau of Public Roads designated a national highway system, which incorporated existing road systems. Thus, sections of the Ozark Trail in Oklahoma, including the Little Deep Fork Creek Bridge, became part of the new U. S. 66. The bridge is a simple structure, and its skeletal appearance belies its engineering finesse and distinctive features. From the streambed, steel piers rise to form part of the truss structure, giving the appearance of a bedstead with the two sides of the bridge representing the head and foot of the bed. The piers are the critical and defining element of the bridge. They consist of four steel beams sunk deep into the shoulders of the stream banks. Through a system of triangular trusses organized in rectangular units. The piers form the end of not only the trusses but of the bridge itself and thereby making the bridge essentially self-supporting.

Stop #41, Rock Cafe, 114 West Main, Stroud

Stroud's Rock Cafe is one of the best-known places to eat on Historic Route 66. Built by Roy Rives, it opened for business on August 4, 1939, and was an instant success serving beer, soft drinks and meals to the traveling public. During World War II, the cafe became a Greyhound Bus stop, adding to its economic importance to the community and providing a way-station for home-sick servicemen. After the war, the cafe operated 24 hours-a-day. It became a very popular stop for vacationing families, truckers, and high school students. The Rock Cafe is a single-story building constructed of coursed, rubble sandstone with un-tooled mortar joints. It has parapet walls, a flat roof, and a wide over-hanging eave that shields the sandstone wall. A large stone chimney is a prominent feature of the front facade. Over time, the interior was modified, and a patio was added to the west side of the building. Then, in 2008, a tragic fire almost destroyed the cafe. However, the owner was determined to save the landmark and reopened it in 2010 for the loyal, local customers and all of the visitors from around the world who drive the Mother Road anticipating burgers and fries at the Rock Cafe.

Stop #42, Hotel Lincoln, 323 Main, Stroud

The Hotel Lincoln was Stroud's primary hostelry for travelers from the designation of U. S. 66 in 1926 until the end of World War II. While tourist courts and motels quickly appeared along the new federal highway, the Hotel Lincoln was one of the few hotels serving Route 66 travelers in Oklahoma. Located on a prominent corner, it is a two-story, brick commercial style building with a canted entrance. The building originally consisted of one story, like the other buildings on the block, and housed a drug store. Then, in 1924 the second story was added to accommodate the hotel function. Steel pilasters define the canted entry door of single glass and aluminum side lights. Above the entry is a wooden transom divided into three individual window panes. On either side of the entry are brick pilasters. Although the hotel has been modified through time, it continues to convey its association with the early decades of travel on Route 66 and the economic benefits the traffic brought to Stroud.

Stop #43, Ozark Trail Section of Route 66, Junction of County Road #E0890 & the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad Tracks, Stroud vicinity (Ends, Stop #44)

By 1915, Lincoln County lacked what could technically be considered a system of roads. That year, the Ozark Trail Association petitioned the county commissioners to establish a county road system and to designate "…this roadbed segment as part of the Frisco-Ozark Trail system." Construction for this section of road occurred between 1915 and 1917 and became part of the Ozark Trail network connecting small towns throughout the county. The historic features at this location include the eighteen feet wide, improved dirt with gravel roadbed; the Ozark Trail marker; several stone box drains; and the Dosie Creek Bridge, a Pratt Pony Truss structure. When U. S. 66 was designated in 1926, this road became part of the alignment. Then, in 1930, it was bypassed when a section of new paved road was constructed to the north.

Stop #44, Ozark Trail Section of Route 66, Junction of County Road #E0890 & the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad Tracks, Stroud vicinity (Begins, Stop #43)

By 1915, Lincoln County lacked what could technically be considered a system of roads. That year, the Ozark Trail Association petitioned the county commissioners to establish a county road system and to designate "…this roadbed segment as part of the Frisco-Ozark Trail system." Construction for this section of road occurred between 1915 and 1917 and became part of the Ozark Trail network connecting small towns throughout the county. The historic features at this location include the eighteen feet wide, improved dirt with gravel roadbed; the Ozark Trail marker; several stone box drains; and the Dosie Creek Bridge, a Pratt Pony Truss structure. When U.S. 66 was designated in 1926, this road became part of the alignment. Then, in 1930, it was bypassed when a section of new paved road was constructed to the north.

Stop #45, Chandler Armory, Junction of Mickey Clarkson Avenue & 1st, Chandler

The Chandler Armory, listed in the National Register of Historic Places, was constructed by the Works Progress Administration, and the project provided work for unemployed laborers and stimulated the local economy. The building is an excellent example of WPA architecture and is built of native sandstone. The armory was the home of the Oklahoma National Guard, 45th Infantry Division's Battery F, Second Battalion of the 160th Field Artillery, which played an important role in North Africa, Sicily, and Italy during World War II. Today, the armory houses the Chandler Route 66 Interpretive Center. Travelers of all ages will delight in the nostalgic trip down "The Mother Road" experienced through videos portraying Oklahoma's part in the formation of the sights and sounds that are Route 66. Visitors will experience an entertaining "drive" from the 1920's through current-day Oklahoma on what author John Steinbeck called, in his classic novel, The Grapes of Wrath, our "Mother Road," Route 66. For information about hours of operation and admission fees, call 405/258-1300 or visit http://www.route66interpretivecenter.org.

Stop #46, Phillips 66 Station #1423, 701 Manvel Avenue, Chandler

The Phillips 66 Station #1423 is a cottage style gas station opened in 1930 and is typical of the design that the Phillips Petroleum Company used during this time period. It mimics the Tudor Revival style architecture popular in the 1920s with its masonry, steeply pitched gabled roof, high chimneys, and tall windows. Petroleum companies adopted their own distinctive designs for their stations, just as many businesses do today. The combination of cottage and Tudor Revival was the most popular type for Phillips stations, and between 1928 and 1945, the company built over 300 like this one. The Chandler station is a striking visual symbol of the cultural, economic, and social impacts of Route 66 on local communities and the state.

Stop #47, Crane Motor Company Building, 722 Manvel Avenue, Chandler

The Crane Motor Company Building on Manvel Avenue, Chandler's Main Street and Route 66 alignment is significant for its role in the community's commercial development. Clyde Crane and L. P. Anderson were the first businessmen in Lincoln County to sell and service Fords. Although many automobile service facilities of the early Twentieth century were converted blacksmith shops, livery stables and carriage and bicycle stores, the Crane Motor Company Building was constructed specifically to assemble, sell, and repair automobiles. As was typical of dealership design of the time, the front of the first floor showcased cars through large plate glass windows, and the rear served as a storage and repair area. Employees assembled the incoming cars on the second floor. The two-story, brick commercial style building has a sandstone veneer on the north elevation and a simple cornice. The original doors and windows have been replaced with many openings in-filled completely, and an awning obscures the clerestory windows.

Stop #48, St. Cloud Hotel, 1216 Manvel Avenue, Chandler

The St. Cloud Hotel is an excellent example of the early hotels that capitalized on the growing number of Route 66 travelers and salesmen in the mid-twentieth century. John E. Gormley, a grocer and lumberman purchased two Chandler lots in 1903 for $500 and built the hotel. A year later, he acquired two adjoining lots to the south and constructed a dining room and kitchen. The property became known as, "Gormley's Block." Originally, the hotel had a saloon named the Silver King Bar which operated until Oklahoma became a state in 1907. The new state constitution prohibited the sale of alcoholic beverages. By the time Route 66 was designated in 1926, the St. Cloud was well known as a salesman's hotel. As important as the dining and sleeping accommodations, was the special "sample room" for the display of new products. Salesmen even had their own separate dining room. The hotel is a two-story brick and sandstone building. The second story is covered with an ornate pressed tin facade with classical columns and rosettes and capped with a large pressed tin cornice. Take special notice of the restored ghost sign on the hotel's side elevation.

Stop #49, Seaba's Filling Station, 8 miles west of Chandler on Route 66, Chandler vicinity

Built in 1921, Seaba's Filling Station is located on a curve of Route 66 eight miles west of Chandler and near the Warwick community. The typical early filling station/repair garage was a neighborhood business, and Seaba's provided automotive services for this part of rural Lincoln County. By the late 1920s, John Seaba, the original owner, had expanded from a gasoline station into a hybrid of filling station and repair garage to service the ever-increasing number of Route 66 travelers. He also began to purchase Model T Fords and to assemble them in the rear workshop. In the 1930s, he acquired more equipment to repair automobiles and expanded his number of employees to eighteen. As late as 1985, the shop retained the original equipment. The original service bay is five-sided and covered with polychrome brick. The workshop, located to the rear of the service station is constructed of a lower grade red brick. The roof has a crenelated parapet, capped with white brick. During the 1940s, two small concrete block additions were added to the north and south sides of the building and other alterations have occurred through time.

Stop #50, Captain Creek Bridge, 100 yards West of Junction of Hickory & State Highway 66B, Wellston vicinity

The Captain Creek Bridge was an integral element of the original US 66 alignment which ran through Wellston. Due to a series of delays, this section of the highway remained unpaved until 1933 when the State finally paved the segment and built this bridge. But in the process the State found itself at odds with the United States Bureau of Public Roads. To shorten the alignment, the federal agency required the state to reroute the highway and bypass Wellston a mile to the south. The Captain Creek Bridge is a Camelback Pony Truss bridge made of steel on concrete piers, with a single pony span but augmented with a substantial deck that connects to the abutments. From abutment to abutment, the bridge is 225 feet long, and the camelback pony span segment is one hundred feet in length. The deck is made of concrete, now covered with asphalt and is twenty-two feet wide. This bridge type incorporates five angles in the upper cord, diagonal trusses on the ends, an X brace in the center, and vertical steel posts at each angle. The deck and truss rest on long I-beams that are supported from the streambed by two piers and abutments at the ends. Although it was only a part of Route 66 for a brief time, the bridge remains an important part of Route 66 history and is an excellent example of bridge design and construction.

Stop #51, Threatt Filling Station, southwest corner, Junction of Highway 66 & Pottawatomie Road, Luther vicinity

The Threatt Filling Station is historically significant for its association with Route 66 and as an example of an African-American owned business on the highway during the era of segregation. The Threatts, an African-American family, came to the central part of present-day Oklahoma in the Land Run of 1889. Allen Threatt, Sr. and his family built the station in 1915, eleven years before the designation of US 66. The Threatt Filling Station is an example of a house type Bungalow/Craftsman style service station. The one-story building is constructed of native stone bound together by prominent beaded mortar joints. Four gables of equal size are formed by the moderately pitched, cross-gabled roof. The gable ends are sheathed with clapboard. The wide eaves of the side gables are supported by triangular knee braces. A brick chimney is positioned in the center of the rear gable of the roof. Two features of the station which remain from its Route 66 heyday, when the station was listed in the National Register, are the gasoline pumps from 1940 on a raised cement drive and a slightly tapered wooden pole located between the pumps, topped with an inverted open triangle and lights on either side. During the World War II era and into the 1950s, the lights illuminated a sign and the pumps.

Stop #52, Arcadia Route 66 Roadbed, Extends South/Southeast from Junction of State Highway 66 & Hiwassee Road, Arcadia vicinity (Ends, Stop #53)

This section of Route 66 roadbed is significant as the only unaltered surviving specimen of the concrete/asphalt "Modified Bates Type" roadway built to the State Highway Commission's standards at the time U.S. 66 was constructed through Oklahoma. The stretch of original roadbed lies along a wooded hillside approximately one mile east of Arcadia and approximately one-half mile north of the Deep Fork of the Canadian River. Blackjack oak, burr oak, cottonwood, cedar, chinaberry, and other indigenous trees as well as an abundance of wildflowers line the roadway. The area is a habitat for coyotes, rabbits, bobcats, raccoon, squirrel and other animals. The roadbed and the natural environment provide a glimpse of what Route 66 travelers experienced decades ago.

Stop #53, Arcadia Route 66 Roadbed, Extends South/Southeast from Junction of State Highway 66 & Hiwassee Road, Arcadia vicinity (Begins, Stop #52)

This section of Route 66 roadbed is significant as the only unaltered surviving specimen of the concrete/asphalt "Modified Bates Type" roadway built to the State Highway Commission's standards at the time U.S. 66 was constructed through Oklahoma. The stretch of original roadbed lies along a wooded hillside approximately one mile east of Arcadia and approximately one-half mile north of the Deep Fork of the Canadian River. Blackjack oak, burr oak, cottonwood, cedar, chinaberry, and other indigenous trees as well as an abundance of wildflowers line the roadway. The area is a habitat for coyotes, rabbits, bobcats, raccoon, squirrel and other animals. The roadbed and the natural environment provide a glimpse of what Route 66 travelers experienced decades ago.

Stop #54, Arcadia Round Barn, 11250 E. Highway 66, Arcadia

Situated immediately beside Route 66, the Arcadia Round Barn continues to be one of the most prominent landmarks for travelers. The small town of Arcadia is located in Oklahoma County which was part of the Unassigned Lands opened for settlement in the Land Run of 1889. William Harrison "Big Bill" Odor constructed the barn in 1898 for his business use in the rural northeastern part of the county. The impressive structure is 43 feet in height and 60 feet in diameter. Odor cut Green burr oak trees growing on his property for timbering, which he soaked in water until soft enough to bend into shape. Then he brought in the flooring, shingles, and siding and the joists, studs, and other dimension lumber, also of oak from his farm. While the barn held hay, grain, and livestock, the quality of its construction and its location soon made it a popular place for dances and other community events as well. Through time, the barn fell into disuse, and by the 1970s, it had deteriorated to the point of near collapse. However, thanks to an extraordinary local volunteer effort, the barn was saved and restored. Today, the Arcadia Historical society owns and maintains the barn. It again serves as a popular community events center and a perfect stop for Route 66 tourists to learn about local history and the Mother Road.

Stop #55, Citizens State Bank, also known as The Gold Dome, 1112 Northwest 23rd Street, Oklahoma City

Commonly referred to as the Gold Dome, the Citizens State Bank a distinctive Modern style building with an unusual, gold-colored, anodized aluminum geodesic dome for a roof, became one of the most popular landmarks on Route 66 in the 1960s. Designed by Robert B. Roloff of Oklahoma City in 1958, the building's dome was originally a bright gold which has faded over the years to a patchy gold and silver color. White struts reinforce the roof panels. The dome rests on two large concrete bents which divides the building into two elevations. Separating the dome from the walls is a ten-foot-wide concrete canopy which encircles the building. The ten-foot high walls are a combination of gold-veined black mosaic tile on the front and light orange and brown brick on the rear. The two public entrances have aluminum glazed slab doors separated by a single wide sidelight with sidelights to the outside. The ribbon windows, dominating the north half of the building, are of fixed aluminum, as are the three sets of shorter ribbon windows located on the south side. The drive-thru is constructed of a matching brick with gold-veined black mosaic tile accents and a glass-enclosed lobby on the far southeast side. The roof of the drive-thru is flat but features a wide undulating, ribbed, gold aluminum coping. The Gold Dome became the focus of controversy when a chain drugstore company announced plans to demolish the landmark. But, local citizens rallied around the dome, and everybody won. The bank got its new, smaller building near by, the drugstore located at the same intersection, and a new owner rehabilitated the Gold Dome for a new mixed use.

Stop #56, Lake Overholser Bridge, .5 mile West of North Council Road on North Overholser Drive, Oklahoma City

Located on the west side of Oklahoma County where Route 66 leaves the greater Oklahoma City metropolitan area heading west, the Lake Overholser Bridge is a mixed truss bridge of impressive design and proportions. The bridge carries traffic over the North Canadian River as it empties into the Oklahoma City municipal reservoir, Lake Overholser. Constructed in 1924 and 1925, this bridge represents a significant engineering accomplishment that served Route 66 travelers for three decades and continues to serve the motoring public today. A defining feature of the bridge is that it is constructed of two different types of steel trusses. Each end of the bridge has a camelback Warren Pony Truss and between those lower, open, trusses on the ends, four Parker Through Trusses rise overhead and add mass and height to the structure. Today the bridge carries only local traffic. A modern divided highway and an alternate bridge now pass immediately to the north. When safety concerns about the historic bridge arose, City of Oklahoma City officials and local civic leaders decided that this Route 66 icon should be rehabilitated rather than demolished, and the Lake Overholser Bridge reopened to vehicular traffic in the fall of 2011.

Stop #57, Jackson Conoco Service Station, 301 South Choctaw (also known as 121 West Wade), El Reno

The Jackson Conoco Service Station, located on a corner where Route 66 makes a ninety degree turn, is a T-shaped single-story house-with-bays design. It was constructed in 1934 and added onto in 1964. The cottage style design and materials of the original building conform to the design favored by the Continental Oil Company in the 1930s. The style became synonymous with Conoco and served as their advertising logo. The Jackson Conoco Service Station's original office section, on the north, is ten feet wide on the western elevation and eight feet on the north elevation with a steep pitched gable on the north. Next to the office, on the south, is a section that is slightly larger on each elevation giving the building its t-shape. A distinguishing feature of Conoco stations of this vintage is the decorative corbelling at the corners to support the eaves as they project beyond the elevation. As with other Route 66 service stations, business boomed for this one until Interstate 40 bypassed El Reno to the south.

Stop #58, Avant's Cities Service Station, 220 South Choctaw, El Reno

Constructed on Route 66 in 1933, shortly after the last stretch of the highway between Oklahoma City and El Reno was paved, the Avant's Cities Service Station was designed in the Art Deco Style preferred by the chain. Increased business from traffic along Route 66 resulted in the expansion of the original station into a multi-bay facility. A single story building with a parapet and flat roof, the front elevation of the station is a generally long continuous plane segmented only by pilasters. The building is actually irregular in shape on its other elevations. Cities Service Oil Company leased the site of the old Campbell Hotel and built the service station. The building initially consisted of the two southern-most sections, which formed an L-shaped unit with the office on the south and the service bay on the north, these two are defined and separated from the remainder of the building by a rounded curb on the east. Two bays were eventually added on the north. Stations like the Avant's Cities Service Station were highly successful businesses until Interstate 40 opened.

Stop #59, Bridgeport Hill - Hydro, Route 66 Segment, State Highway 66 from Hydro East to US-281 Spur, Bridgeport vicinity, ends at Stop #61

Stretching east from Hydro to the US-281 Spur, a distance of 17.7 miles, is one of the longest intact segments of original Route 66 paving in western Oklahoma. Constructed of Portland Cement with integral curbs and drains, the section represents the best highway engineering practices of the late 1920s and 1930s. It includes the William H. Murray Bridge, which consists of thirty-eight Warren Pony Truss spans making it the second longest bridge in Oklahoma.

Stop #60, Bridgeport Hill Service Station, Junction of Old Route 66 & US-281 Spur, Geary vicinity

The Bridgeport Hill Service Station is a case study in how US Highway 66 offered new opportunities in commerce. This simple house and canopy style gas station was constructed by Leroy Tilley in 1934 at the top of Bridgeport Hill. Its location on a newly-opened section of Route 66 attracted many travelers. The station afforded Tilley a steady income that more than made up for the depressed business returns from his farm. Success and location eventually worked to convince Tilley to add a separate service bay to the operation.

Stop #61, Bridgeport Hill - Hydro, Route 66 Segment, State Highway 66 from Hydro East to US-281 Spur, Bridgeport vicinity, begins at Stop #59

Stretching east from Hydro to the US-281 Spur, a distance of 17.7 miles, is one of the longest intact segments of original Route 66 paving remaining in western Oklahoma. Constructed of Portland Cement with integral curbs and drains, the section represents the best highway engineering practices of the late 1920s and 1930s. It includes the William H. Murray Bridge, which consists of thirty-eight Warren Pony Truss spans making it the second longest bridge in Oklahoma.

Stop #62, Provine Service Station (also known as Lucille's), .5 mile East of Junction of Interstate-40 & State Highway 58, Hydro vicinity

Constructed in 1929, the Provine Service Station is one of the most famous landmarks on Route 66 through Oklahoma. This small two-story building is a vernacular interpretation of the Bungalow/Craftsman architectural style popular in the 1920s. The first story functioned as the service station, while the second story was the living quarters for the Ditmore family, the first owners. Not only did the station provide a convenient stop for gasoline, but tourist cabins were also available during the 1930s. Perhaps the station is best known for a subsequent owner, Lucille Hamons, and most everyone knows the station today as Lucille's. She was one of the people who gave the "Mother Road" its special character. She served as an enthusiastic Route 66 promoter until her death. She is buried in a local cemetery, and her tombstone was appropriately cut in the shape of the Route 66 shield.

Stop #63, Oklahoma Route 66 Museum, 2229 Gary Boulevard, Clinton

Take a break from driving the historic highway and visiting properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places and visit the Oklahoma Historical Society's Oklahoma Route 66 Museum. The museum's galleries offer visitors a personal journey through the history of the nation's most revered highway. Encounter the iconic ideas, images, and myths of the Mother Road. Learn about the dreams and the labor that made the road a reality. Experience the dust bowl as did the thousands who streamed away from drought and despair and toward the "land of promise." Listen to the sounds of the Big Band Era, when the roar of the big trucks and the welcome home cries to returning soldiers were clearly heard along the road. Sit at the counter or a booth in the 1950's diner and feel the open road as did all of those vacationing families. You just might hear their chatter over lunch. For information about hours of operation and admission fees, call 580/323-7866 or visit http://www.route66.org.

Stop #64, Y Service Station & Cafe, 1733 Neptune Drive, Clinton

Clinton's Y Service Station and Café at Neptune Park illustrate the historical forces associated with Route 66 in Oklahoma both in its origins and in its demise. Route 66 once held out the promise of commercial success and countless small businesses, like this one, emerged along the highway to serve the traffic it carried. But what Route 66 brought, circumstances and time could take away. When Interstate 40 replaced the Mother Road, the business opportunities transformed and declined. Designed in the Mission Revival style and built in 1937, this one and two story station was strategically located on a triangular piece of land where Route 66 and Highway 183 split. It sold gasoline, provided automotive repair services, and featured a restaurant and tourist court, which was destroyed about 1992.

Stop #65, Canute Service Station, Southwest corner of Main and Route 66, Canute

The Canute Service Station is a one-story, rectangular shaped, stuccoed building with an extended canopy. Like other service stations, it played an essential role in the commerce of Route 66, providing services to local customers and travelers along America's Main Street. Also, the station is an excellent example of the Southwestern adaptation of the Art Deco architectural style known as Pueblo Deco. The style was heavily influenced by the Native American and Hispanic cultures in a streamlined, Moderne design. Characteristics of the style found at the Canute Service Station include a stucco exterior wall with a wide variety of southwestern motifs. At each corner of the building and at each corner of the canopy are castellations alternating with triangular pediments capped with tile coping.

Stop #66, Casa Grande Hotel, 103 East 3rd, Elk City

Situated on a prominent corner in downtown Elk City, the hotel is a four-story, Spanish Eclectic style building. Built in 1928, by E. M. Woody, a long-time hotel owner from Bristow, Oklahoma, the Casa Grande Hotel was designed by the noted Oklahoma City architectural firm of Hawk and Parr. Constructed of buff brick, the exterior architectural detailing includes arched windows and a double-door arched entry. A decorative Bedford stone surround with ornamental carved shields and outlined in a rope design, frames the arch of the side entry doors. A small central window, with a segmental-arched lintel and an ornate wrought iron ballconet, is set within the Bedford stone. The architectural style was at the height of its popularity during the 1920s and early 1930s and was especially fashionable along the southern portion of Route 66 as it reflected the heritage of the American Southwest. It was the largest hotel on the route between Oklahoma City and Amarillo and represents the high-water mark of first-class hotels along the highway when small communities catered to the well-to-do traveler. But, such elegant buildings were soon replaced by the more homogenous tourist court and motel.

Stop #67, National Route 66 Museum, 2717 West 3rd Street, Elk City

Be sure to stop in at the National Route 66 Museum. Through its road motif exhibit, visitors travel through all eight states along "The Mother Road". The trip begins in Chicago and ends in California. Murals and vignettes depict the eras of the road and the places that made Route 66 so famous. As you travel along the museum's highway, you listen to recorded histories and personal accounts of the road from overhead audio kiosks. Visitors are welcome to select from the extensive collection of travel and museum brochures for the Elk City area and greater Oklahoma. The museum is not listed in the National Register of Historic Places, but anyone interested in learning about the many historic buildings along the way will be sure to find the exhibits informative and entertaining. For information about hours of operation and admission fees call 580/225-6266 or visit http://www.elkcity.com and scroll to museums.

Stop #68, Sayre, Sayre Downtown Historic District, Main & 4th, Sayre

The Sayre Downtown Historic District is the community's commercial center. The district is three blocks in size and includes about three dozen historic buildings constructed between 1903 and 1952. Following Oklahoma statehood in 1907 and the selection of Sayre as the Beckham county seat, construction of substantial brick commercial buildings increased, and a second building boom occurred after World War I. the buildings were designed in the commercial style. They are one to two stories in height with flat roofs and constructed of brick. Their ornamentation ranges from the opulent to the plain. Sayre's economy also benefitted from the designation of US Highway 66 in 1926. Entering town from the north along fourth Street, Route 66 originally turned west on Main Street to Eighth Street where it curved mid-block and headed south on 9th Street, until it crossed the Red River. About a mile south of the river, the highway swung to the west before dropping south into the town of Erick. In the late 1950s, a new bridge was built over the Red River on Fourth Street. When Interstate 40 opened in the 1960s, much of the Route 66 traffic moved to the new, faster highway. However, much of the historic roadbed remains near the Interstate, and it continues to serve local traffic and those who just want to experience the Mother Road.

Stop #69, Sayre Champlin Service Station, 5th and Main, Sayre

Constructed in 1934 to meet the needs of locals and travelers on Route 66, the Sayre Champlin Service Station is an oblong box building located on the southeast corner of the intersection of Fifth and Main, one block west of Sayre's business district. This single-story structure boasts a flat roof, concrete walls and a combination of large plate glass windows and metal multi-light windows. Decorative lines emphasize the horizontal, streamlined commercial form of the Art Moderne architectural style. The defining design elements are the pilasters rounded at the top before they reach the coping of the wall and the long horizontal ovals high above the windows between the pilasters. During the first two decades of the Twentieth Century, only local independent operators owned gasoline stations, in this case, the Prince Brothers. Even so, just as Route 66 spawned countless small business operations along its path, it also set into motion forces that undermined those independent businesses. As traffic increased, petroleum companies that had previously focused their efforts on one aspect of the oil business began to integrate vertically so that they would control their product from its source underground through its refining into a marketable product and to its final retail distribution. In 1928 the brothers sold their station location to the Champlin Refining Company. Champlin operated the station for four decades. But, the rerouting of Route 66 and the eventual opening of Interstate 40 drew customers away from the historic station and resulted in its closure.

Stop #70, Sayre City Park, 200 yards South of Junction of County Roads #E1200 & #N1870, Sayre

Constructed by the WPA in 1940-41, the new city park represented the efforts of Sayre Civic leaders to provide amenities to both locals and travelers on Route 66. Later expansion included a campsite, gazebo, and additional landscape features. The park's centerpiece was a Pueblo-Revival style bathhouse and swimming pool constructed of locally quarried red sandstone. The Sayre City Park is situated on the fringe of town, one mile south of the business district, in a semi-rural area that travelers on Route 66 passed by as they approached Sayre from the west or departed from the east. The park consists of an extensive, partially developed area containing a golf course, rodeo grounds and baseball fields. The WPA portion of the park includes the miniature golf course, the playground, a pavilion, the swimming pool and bathhouse, the pump house, a large gazebo, tennis courts, and camping facilities, as well as fire pits, picnic tables, and walking trails. The Sayre City Park provided so many amenities that it became a favorite, convenient place to stop and rest and even spend the night. In a time when both motels and automobiles lacked air conditioning, the park lured tourists from the highway to the welcoming swimming pool. But, ultimately, the new Interstate 40 provided a faster route for travelers. They no longer needed to stop in the park, or at least they stopped taking time to do so.

Stop #71, West Winds Motel, 623 Roger Miller, Erick

Built shortly after World War II, the West Winds Motel was a tourist court located five blocks west of Erick's main downtown intersection on Route 66 where it conveniently served the tremendous volume of traffic on the highway. The motel is an excellent example of the Mission Revival style of architecture with stucco walls and a red tile-shaped metal Mansard roof with flat peaks that rise in steps above each unit. The West Winds Motel consists of two buildings and a once-flashing neon sign with the motel name beneath a bucking bronco. At the end of World War II, the Erick Chamber of Commerce printed a circular to promote development in the town, proclaiming that "Erick is not a war spoiled town or just another boom town, but a town with a half century of service." The role of U.S. Route 66 in the local economy is clear. At the time, the community had four tourist courts, two hotels, three auto supply stores, dealers for Ford and Chevrolet automobiles, seven auto repair shops, and nine filling stations. In the spring of 1946, Jack Rittenhouse noted in his guide book to Route 66, that when travelers passed through the north part of town, the main street - named Broadway - was lined with service stations, cafes, and motels to serve the burgeoning traffic on Route 66.

Stop #72, Magnolia Service Station, Southwest corner of the Junction of Elm Street & US-66, Texola

The Magnolia Service Station was constructed circa 1930 in the simple box and canopy design and was built of rock-faced block. It typifies the small town service station that catered to local customers, as well as travelers on Route 66. During the 1930s, the low sales of gasoline prompted companies to expand their retail locations, and new service stations were built with large display rooms and storage rooms. Automobile repair also became an integral part of the "service station," and additional bays were required. The design changed from the residential style to a more streamlined building with all service incorporated under one roof. Influenced by the International architectural style, the new design was also a response to the depression and the lack of money to spend on more ornate buildings. This service station design remained in favor until the 1960s.