Artifacts

Allan's Cowboy Hat

Worn by Allan Houser

Allan's Cowboy Hat

Allan wore this straw cowboy hat with the beaded hat band most of the time when he was working. He used to change between this cowboy hat and his beret on a daily basis, wearing one or the other on any given day.
Loan courtesy Mrs. Anna Marie Houser


Allan's Beret

Worn by Allan Houser

Allan's Beret

According to his family, Allan wore his beret when his photo was being taken and his cowboy hat when he was working.
Loan courtesy of Mrs. Anna Marie Houser

Allan's Work Platform and Tools

Used by Allan Houser

Allan's Work Platform and Tools

"I work with clay and pull it around and see what I can do with experimental forms. When I'm creating something in my design studio, I'm there with the clay, and after a while maybe something begins to build. One of the good things is creating something that you've never seen before." - Allan Houser
Loan courtesy of Allan Houser Foundation

Allan's Sketch Books

Allan Houser

Allan's Sketch Books

Allan Houser was always sketching, whether it was in these sketchbooks or on a napkin or piece of paper he happened to have handy. Mrs. Houser recalls driving down the road with the family and all of a sudden Allan would say, 'take the wheel,' and he would start sketching. He was always creating. During his lifetime, Allan drew thousands of sketches.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Nature's Beauty

Allan Houser
Plaster, 1990

Nature's Beauty Audio about Nature's Beauty Read Transcript

Sculpting plaster provided Houser with new avenues and opportunities not found in stone, bronze or wood. For many American Indians, the bison is a sacred symbol of lost power and freedom. To Houser, the bison was a symbol of fluid motion and strength.
Loan courtesy of Allan Houser Foundation

Amorphous Movement

Allan Houser
Wood Carving and Bronze, 1992

Amorphous Movement Audio about Amorphous Movement Read Transcript

Allan Houser usually started his sculptures with drawings. This piece is different in that it started with a block of pine that he started to carve. He let the wood speak for itself with the end result being a fluid abstract form that follows the grain of the wood.
Loan courtesy of Allan Houser Foundation

Cradle Board

Made by Haozous Family
Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache
c. 1910

Cradle Board

This particular cradle board is a Haozous family heirloom. Most likely made by Blossom White Haozous, mother of Allan, and used by his siblings. Allan was one of five children, born to Sam and Blossom Haozous and raised at the family farm in Apache, Oklahoma. This cradle board is made in the style typical of Apache cradle boards consisting of a wooden frame and curved bow at the head of the cradle board Buckskin is wrapped around the frame and makes the body of the cradle. The infant is securely laced inside the cradle with a wooden footrest at the base of the cradle.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Athanacious Embrace

Phillip M. Haozous
Bronze, 1999

Athanacious Embrace Audio about Athanacious Embrace Read Transcript

"This sculptural piece is the result of my initial venture into clay as a medium. My goal for this particular piece was to capture the passion and power of two people in love. The name Athanacious is a Greek word meaning eternal." - Phillip M. Haozous.
Loan courtesy of Phillip M. Haozous

Guardian Spirit

Phillip M. Haozous
Bronze, 1999

Guardian Spirit Audio about Guardian Spirit Read Transcript

"As an artist, I knew that I wanted to explore working with larger and more monumental images than I had worked with in the past. This particular piece is part of that process of exploration." - Phillip M. Haozous.
Loan courtesy of Phillip M. Haozous

Celestial Maiden

Phillip M. Haozous
Bronze, 2004

Celestial Maiden Audio about the Celestial Maiden Read Transcript

"The predecessor to this piece was carved from a meteorite that had fallen to earth in Argentina. The title of the sculpture is inspired, of course, by that heavenly descent." - Phillip M. Haozous.
Loan courtesy of Phillip M. Haozous

Apache Love Song

Phillip M. Haozous
Bronze, 2005

Apache Love Song Audio about Apache Love Song Read Transcript

"In Apache culture, flute music was an essential part of courtship, an expression of affection. The ardor felt by this young warrior for his maiden is evident as he offers her a love song." - Phillip M. Haozous.
Loan courtesy of Phillip M. Haozous

Leather Guitar Strap

Roy Houser
Leather, nd

Leather Guitar Strap

Roy Houser is the second oldest son of Allan and Anna Marie Houser. This guitar strap, made and carved from leather, was crafted by Roy. His younger brother Phillip recalls fond memories of growing up with Roy and his free spirit.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Back and Forth Dance with Allan Houser

Phillip M. Haozous
Bronze, 1999

Back and Forth Dance with Allan Houser

"I used to do the back and forth dances there all night till daybreak." - Allan Houser

In this sculpture, Phillip Haozous depicted his father, Allan, dancing with his cousin, Mildred Imach Cleghorn, and his sister, Patricia Haozous Regan. Phillip has memories of his father dancing at their tribal gatherings growing up.
Loan courtesy of Phillip M. Haozous

Allan's Flute

Used by Allan Houser
Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache
c. 1970-1994

Allan's Flute

This particular flute was Allan Houser's favorite flute to play. Although Allan didn't make flutes, he did play them. The flutes in his personal collection were usually gifts or made by his son, Phillip Haozous.
Loan courtesy of Allan Houser Foundation

Sam's Flute

Made by Sam Haozous
Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache
c. 1940

Sam's Flute

Allan Houser's parents, Sam and Blossom Haozous, made many Apache material culture items throughout their lifetime including flutes, cradle boards, buckskin bags, and bows to name a few. This flute was one of the family heirlooms that belonged to Allan's personal collection.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Powwow Singers

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1980

Powwow Singers Audio about Apache Love Song Read Transcript

"I went to the Indian powwows around Apache, and danced with the Plains youngsters." Ė Allan Houser.
In this piece, Houser depicted five Indian men that he created from his mindís eye and his memories of southwest Oklahoma and the different tribes around Apache, Oklahoma. Houser recalled later that a person looked at this sculpture and said, "I know every one of those men."
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Beaded bag

Made by Amy White Imach
Fort Sill Apache
c. 1925

Beaded Bag

Beaded Apache bag, made of brain-tanned hide, adorned with Apache bead work designs on both sides of the bag, with long single strands of assorted bead colors hung from the base of the bag. Amy White Imach, sister of Blossom White Haozous, and aunt to Allan Houser, made this particular bag.
OHS Collection 01497

Cane

Apache
c. 1900

Cane

Wooden cane, adorned with Apache bead work designs along the lower half of the cane. The middle and upper portion of the cane is adorned with a snake motif, wrapped around the cane. According to the file, this piece is labeled as "Geronimoís cane." Geronimo led the resistance against the U.S. Army in the taking of ancestral Apache lands. Facing starvation, Geronimo and his people eventually surrendered. They remained prisoners of war for 27 years. The Apache prisoners of war were faced with disease, starvation, and unsanitary living conditions. To earn some income for their families, they made Apache material cultural items and sold them to tourists. Geronimo had earned quite a reputation in the Anglo press, so Apaches would use his name to sell their wares. This cane was likely not made by Geronimo.
OHS Collection 03892



Water Jug

Apache
c. 1880

Water Jug

Water is an essential resource needed by all creatures. Apache people historically lived in a harsh, arid, desert environment, ranging between mountains and plains. The jug itself is woven from willow and rightly coiled. Pitch, a waterproofing agent, was then warmed and applied to both the inside and outside of the water jug. Thus, you have a waterproof container, which was ideal, especially in a desert environment where water is scarce. Women usually made these water jugs, along with the rest of the material culture items. Allan Houser depicted women with these water jugs in his bronze work.
OHS Collection 1984.059.003

Sisters II

Phillip M. Haozous
Bronze, 2003

Sisters II Audio about Sisters II Read Transcript

This sculpture was an experiment with two similar forms and how they directly relate to each other. This piece was the third in a series leading to the creation of the monumental Sisters III.

Ready for Battle

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1985

Ready for Battle Audio about Ready for Battle Read Transcript

"Iíve heard stories about my grandfather, who was killed in a battle. Iíve been told that on that occasion the Apaches were ambushed by Mexican soldiers. Several braves volunteered to give up their lives, to fight until death to hold off the Mexicans so that the rest of the band could escape...my grandfather was one of the heroes." - Allan Houser.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

 Bugle

Owned by Sam Haozous
c. 1893

Bugle

Bugle used by Sam Haozous, father of Allan Houser. In the last part of the 19th century, the U.S. Army developed an experimental military force composed of all-Indian units; specifically, Troop L Cavalry and Company I of the Infantry. During the Apaches' imprisonment in Florida and Mount Vernon Barracks, Alabama, Sam Haozous, along with other Apache prisoners of war, were recruited into Company I, Army Infantry regiment.
Loan courtesy Allan Houser Foundation

 Saber

Haozous
c. 1893

Saber

This saber belonged to Sam Haozous, father of Allan Houser. In 1894, when the Apache prisoners of war were relocated to Fort Sill, Oklahoma Territory, they were transferred to Troop L of the 7th U.S. Cavalry, composed of Kiowa, Comanche, Cheyenne, and Arapaho individuals. Although the Apache soldiers were prisoners of war, they performed all of the duties and functions of U.S. Army soldiers: carrying weapons, escorting payroll, etc. The U.S. Army deactivated the all-Indian units, including Troop L at Fort Sill, in June 1897 and the troops were discharged.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation


Bow

Made by Sam Haozous
c. 1935

Bow

This wooden bow was made and painted by Sam Haozous, father of Allan Houser. Allan remembered his father giving him direction on details of his paintings and drawings depicting Apaches, particularly the design on a saddle bag or the how the moccasins looked and the everyday dress of Apache men and women.
Loan courtesy Allan Houser Foundation

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