Medium Sculptures

A Safe Return

Allan Houser
Carrara Marble, 1991



A Safe Return

Allan Houser consistently expressed his respect and admiration for woman and for the sense of place or home that they often provided. This marble sculpture conveys both elegance and quiet comfort in its ability to capture a moment between mother and daughter. Another expression of Houser's artistic genius was his ability to sculpt and use marble, stone, bronze, steel, plaster and wood for his sculptures.

"I have the feeling that the image actually emerges from the stone. I can almost see it in that particular stone, as if it's lying in there, trying to get out." - Allan Houser
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Apache Cradleboard

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1994

Apache Cradleboard

In this flowing depiction of a mother and child, Houser again expresses his strong connection and respect for women and their protective tie to children.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

War Pony

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1978

War Pony Audio about War Pony Read Transcript

Through his minimalist approach Houser captures the fierce nature of the horse as an instrument of war.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Spirit House

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1990

Spirit House Audio about Spirit House Read Transcript

With Spirit House, Houser gives form to the concepts of both mobility and sense of place. By using two independent sheets of brass and interlocking them, Houser created a free flowing design that suggests a place to live both mobility and sense of place or home.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Ave-Hoo

Phillip M. Haozous
Clay and Bronze, 2008

"Ave-Hoo" Audio about Ave-Hoo Read Transcript

"The name Ave-Hoo is my own phonetic spelling of the way "Owl" is pronounced in Spanish. My mother, Mrs. Anna Marie Houser, told me that the village of Abiquiu in northern New Mexico was once known as: Ave-Hoo, the bird that says Hoo!" - Phillip M. Haozous
Loan courtesy of Phillip M. Haozous

Sacred Rain Arrow II

Allan Houser
Bronze, nd

Sacred Rain Arrow II

This small bronze is the further development of the first Sacred Rain Arrow sculpture created in ebony by Allan Houser. A story about an Apache man shooting an arrow into the air has been chosen as the image to be placed on Oklahoma state license plates starting in January 2009.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Lament

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1990

Lament Audio about Lament Read Transcript

Much of Houser's work tells stories or conveys messages. His work includes depictions not only of his heritage, Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache, but of other tribes as well. In this particular piece, Houser has a depicted a plains Indian medicine man, as indicated by his war bonnet, holding a bison skull, in prayer.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

The Future

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1985

The Future Audio about The Future Read Transcript

Family is a recurring theme in Allan Houser's art. This sculpture depicts a mother, father and child with a sense of motion added by their posture and the walking stick. From this small bronze was later cast a monumental 14 foot tall sculpture.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Smoke Signals

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1993

Smoke Signals Audio about Smoke Signals Read Transcript

Allan Houser created and cast this sculpture in 1993 as an entry in the Prix de West art show and competition at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. Smoke Signals won the Purchase Prize with its engaging narrative style and elegance of form.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Bust of Allan Houser

Phillip M. Haozous
Bronze, 2001

Bust of Allan Houser Audio about Bust of Allan Houser Read Transcript

A large exhibit of Allan Houser's sculptures was shown at the 2002 Winter Olympics. This bust representing his father was created by Phillip Haozous and shown at the 2002 Winter Olympics.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Sacred Rain Arrow

Allan Houser
Ebony (wood), 1968

Sacred Rain Arrow Audio about Sacred Rain Arrow Read Transcript

This amazing sculpture was carved from a single block of ebony wood. Created in Houser's studio at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, it won the Grand Prize at the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa in 1968.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Dawn

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1989

Dawn Audio about Dawn Read Transcript

This modernistic representation of a reclining female figure illustrates Houser's strong appreciation and respect for the female form as well as providing an example of his skill and command of multiple artistic styles and his ability to express his art and narrative stories in a wide range of media.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Woman of the Plains

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1988

Woman of the Plains

This maquette is the original concept for the monumental piece that Allan created as a special commission that now stands on the south steps of the Oklahoma State Capitol Building. The larger monumental piece is known as As Long As the Waters Flow, 1989. Allan changed the initial design, removing the single eagle feather from the woman's hair, and renamed the piece for the monumental version.
Loan courtesy of Betty and Norris Price

Apache Clowns II

Phillip M. Haozous
Bronze, 2005

Apache Clowns II Audio about Apache Clowns II Read Transcript

Humor is an essential part of Apache culture. This piece tells Phillip's interpretation of a scene he witnessed at a dance where he saw a young boy striving to learn the dance and find his place as a young Apache man.
Loan courtesy of Phillip M. Haozous

Free Spirit

Phillip M. Haozous
Bronze, 2006

Free Spirit Audio about Free Spirit Read Transcript

"My brother, Roy, has spent his life seeking new adventures never staying in one place too long. The colorful stories of his travels intrigued me as a young man and continue to do so to this day. Roy is a true Free Spirit." - Phillip M. Haozous
Loan courtesy of Phillip M. Haozous

Apache Humor

Phillip M. Haozous
Bronze, 2004



Apache Humor

"At our annual Apache gathering in Oklahoma, I observed a humorous interlude between the singers and a new clown. It must have been the clown's first dance . . ." - Phillip M. Haozous.

The older men sitting on the bench are the singers. The two clowns are Apache boys and are dressed according to custom. In the Apache Mountain Spirit dance, the mountain spirits represent stability and foundation, while the clown represents the unpredictable. A person must have strength and foundation to deal with the unpredictable in life, and therefore have balance.
Loan courtesy of Phillip M. Haozous

 Water Spirit Bird

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1980


Water Spirit Bird Audio about  Water Spirit Bird Read Transcript

This bronze depicts the Water Bird, an iconographic symbol associated with the Native American Church. The Native American Church has roots in Oklahoma dating back to the 1880s. The Native American Church blends traditional native religious concepts and Christian theology. Peyote meetings consist of an all night ceremony usually held in a tipi or roundhouse, depending on the tribe, with an altar and articles arranged in a specific manner. At midnight, the participants are allowed to drink water. Water is associated with life and healing. Often times, fans are made of the tail feathers of the water bird and these are used for healing.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

We're Here

Allan Houser
Bronze, 1992






We're Here Audio about We're Here Read Transcript

This piece is one of Houser's water series sculptures, essentially vertical forms with negative space and simplified details. On this particular piece, the only noticeable details are the heshi necklaces that adorn the necks of the two women. The negative space created by the elongated forms of the women is a symbol of fertility. Fertility fused with the life nurturing water is portrayed elegantly and poignantly in this piece.
Loan courtesy of the Allan Houser Foundation

Oklahoma History Center
800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive
Oklahoma City, OK 73105