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Henry and Anna Overholser Mansion
405 NW 15th Street
Oklahoma City, OK 73103
405-525-5325
overholsermansion@ preservationok.org

Hours
Tuesday through Saturday
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Tours
Tuesday and Wednesday, tours are offered at 10 a.m., noon, and 2 p.m., last about 30–45 minutes, and reservations are required.
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, the mansion is open for drop-in tours and no reservations are needed.

Admission
Adults $10
Seniors
(65+)
$7
Students
(age 6–18)
$5
Group Rate (25+) $5/person
OHS Members,
Children (under 6)
Free

Use of drones over Oklahoma Historical Society property is not permitted without written approval of the facility director.

National Register of Historic Places

Henry and Anna Overholser Mansion

Plan Your Visit

On Tuesday and Wednesday, tours are held at 10 a.m., noon, and 2 p.m. only, and reservations are required. Please contact 405-525-5325 or Lisa@PreservationOK.org to make a reservation. Thursday–Saturday, the mansion is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. for drop-in tours, and no reservation is needed.

Handrails, doorknobs, doorbells will be cleaned after each tour. We ask that visitors not touch anything inside the museum, as artifacts and components of the historic building cannot be safely sanitized without harm to the objects.

Visitors to the mansion can now get an up-close and personal look at several rooms. Preservation Oklahoma has enhanced the tour experience thanks to funding from the Oklahoma Historical Society's Oklahoma Heritage Preservation Grant Program. Visitors can now tour the dining room, butler's pantry, and kitchen on the first floor. On the second floor, guests can walk through all bedrooms, as well as the two bathrooms. New signage is in place throughout the home, and we've added historic photos to illustrate what the rooms looked like in decades past. Carpet runners have been placed to protect the over 100-year-old carpet in the home. A pamphlet is available for self-guided tours, and Museum Manager Lisa Escalon is always on hand to provide more information. Volunteers are also available on Saturdays to answer questions.

About the Mansion

Completed in 1903 for one of Oklahoma City’s truly remarkable figures, the Overholser Mansion is a glimpse back in time to the life one of the men responsible for the thriving city we know today. The home showcases original furnishings, stained glass, and ornate canvas painted walls. Preserved to honor the “spirit of the 1889ers,” the Overholser Mansion is an opportunity to discover this remarkable family at an extraordinary time in Oklahoma City’s history.

In 1901 Henry Overholser purchased land north of Oklahoma City for the purpose of building a home. W. S. Matthews, an architect trained at London’s Kensington Academy, supervised the construction and furnishing of the three-story, French chateau-style house. Decorative arts included Brussels lace curtains, English carpets, and French stained-glass windows. The furniture reflected the high style of the period. The mansion has been a focal point of Oklahoma City society since it was opened with a gala reception in 1904. It was often used to entertain prominent cultural figures such as opera singers Ernestine Schumann-Heink and Amelita Gala-Curci.

Later, the mansion served as the official residence of US Senator Mike Monroney from 1956 to 1968. The mansion was acquired by the Oklahoma Historical Society in 1972 through funds raised primarily by the Oklahoma Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Restoration and operation of the mansion has been aided through the efforts of the National Society of Colonial Dames of America; Historical Preservation, Inc.; the Women’s Architectural League; and Friends of the Overholser.

The mansion is located on the northwest corner of North Hudson Avenue and Northwest 15th Street. It is operated by Preservation Oklahoma, a private non-profit dedicated to preserving Oklahoma’s historic places. For more information, visit www.preservationok.org or www.overholsermansion.org.

Visit The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture to find out more about Henry Overholser and Anna Ione Murphy Overholser.

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